University of Tennessee – Memphis

Get ready with us.

What we know about

UT Memphis

's

interview process

Interview Format
Virtual or not?
Historic Interview Date

Add some colour to your answers

Study up on these resources to improve on your answers and stand out from the crowd
Indigenous Health Calls to Action
Health care issues

Recent developments in the search for the children of residential schools have shown that there is much work to be done in terms of truth and reconciliation. Medical schools are similarly placing a higher emphasis on justice for indigenous communities. It's crucial that all applicants understand the Calls to Action, the disparities that indigenous communities face, and how to improve the healthcare system for indigenous peoples.

The Indigenous Health Calls to Action is a response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's recommendations for redressing the historical injustices faced by Indigenous communities in Canada. This initiative aims to improve the healthcare system for Indigenous peoples and address the disparities they face. As future physicians, pre-med students must understand the Calls to Action to better serve Indigenous communities.

The Calls to Action cover various aspects, including child welfare, education, language and culture, health, and justice. It seeks to address the historical context of residential schools and their legacy on Indigenous peoples. Some health-related recommendations include acknowledging the current state of Indigenous health, establishing measurable goals for closing gaps in health outcomes, and providing sustainable funding for healing centers.

For pre-med students, understanding the Calls to Action can help them prepare for a more inclusive and culturally-sensitive healthcare practice. Medical and nursing schools are encouraged to require courses that deal with Indigenous health issues, history, and the legacy of residential schools. Such training should include intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.

By being aware of these Calls to Action, pre-med students can contribute to a more equitable healthcare system, addressing the unique needs of Indigenous communities. This knowledge will allow future physicians to provide better care to Indigenous patients, understand the historical context of their health disparities, and work collaboratively with Indigenous healers and Elders when appropriate. Overall, understanding the Indigenous Health Calls to Action is crucial for pre-med students to become well-rounded and compassionate physicians capable of serving diverse populations.

Indigenous Health - Jordan's Principle
Health care issues

Jordan's Principle is a vital initiative in Canada that ensures all First Nations children living in the country have access to the products, services, and supports they need when they need them. This initiative addresses a wide range of health, social, and educational needs, including the unique requirements of First Nations Two-Spirit and LGBTQQIA children and youth and those with disabilities.

For premed students, understanding and applying Jordan's Principle is essential in preparing for their roles as future physicians. By familiarizing themselves with this principle, students can develop cultural competence, appreciate the importance of substantive equality, and learn to provide culturally appropriate services to First Nations children. This understanding will help them safeguard the best interests of their patients and ensure all children have an equal chance to thrive.

Between July 2016 and April 30, 2022, more than 1.53 million products, services, and supports were approved under Jordan's Principle, including speech therapy, educational supports, medical equipment, and mental health services. By acknowledging the significance of Jordan's Principle and its impact on First Nations children's lives, premed students can better prepare to serve these communities in a culturally sensitive and equitable manner.

In summary, Jordan's Principle is crucial in addressing the needs of First Nations children in Canada. For premed students, understanding and applying this principle will help them develop cultural competence, provide culturally appropriate care, and work towards achieving health equity for their future patients.

Canadian Medical Association Journal - Ethics Section
Bioethics

The Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) - Ethics Section is a valuable resource that offers an in-depth exploration of ethical and topical issues in Canadian medicine. By delving into various ethical challenges, dilemmas, and perspectives, this section can help premed students prepare as future physicians by broadening their understanding of ethical considerations and fostering a strong foundation in medical ethics.

As premed students prepare for their medical careers, it is essential for them to be well-versed in the ethical principles that govern the practice of medicine. The CMAJ - Ethics Section can provide insights into current debates, emerging trends, and complex issues that physicians may encounter in their professional lives. These ethical discussions can range from informed consent, patient autonomy, and end-of-life care to research ethics, resource allocation, and medical professionalism.

By studying the Ethics Section of the CMAJ, premed students can develop a greater awareness of the ethical dimensions of medical practice and learn to navigate difficult decisions with compassion and integrity. Moreover, engaging with these topics can help students build critical thinking skills, enhance their empathy, and foster a commitment to ethical decision-making in their future careers.

In summary, the Canadian Medical Association Journal - Ethics Section is a valuable resource for premed students, as it offers a comprehensive examination of the ethical issues facing Canadian medicine. By engaging with these topics, students can develop a strong ethical foundation, preparing them to become compassionate and responsible physicians.

Volunteering Pros and Cons
Self-reflection

Volunteering can open doors and create life-changing experiences. For premed students, it's a fantastic way to gain valuable insights, develop essential skills, and stand out to admissions officers. Here's why you should consider volunteering and how to navigate potential challenges.

Pros:

  1. Develop essential skills: Volunteering equips you with vital skills such as communication, teamwork, leadership, and problem-solving, all of which are crucial for success in medical school and beyond.
  2. Gain real-world experiences: Engage in hands-on experiences in healthcare settings, allowing you to observe medical professionals and better understand the realities of the field.
  3. Enhance your resume: A strong volunteering record demonstrates your dedication, motivation, and passion for medicine, setting you apart from the competition.
  4. Expand your network: Connect with professionals and fellow volunteers who can offer invaluable advice, support, and potential job opportunities in the future.
  5. Personal growth: Volunteering fosters empathy, compassion, and understanding, traits that are essential for a successful medical career.

Cons:

  1. Time commitment: Balancing volunteering with academic work and other responsibilities can be challenging. Prioritize and manage your time effectively to avoid burnout.
  2. Finding the right opportunity: Seek out meaningful and relevant opportunities that align with your interests and goals. Research thoroughly and reach out to professionals in the field for guidance.

Embrace the transformative power of volunteering and let it shape your future in medicine. You'll develop essential skills, gain valuable experiences, and stand out in the admissions process, all while making a positive impact on the lives of others.

Review other universities to practice across a broad range of scenarios

Université de Montréal

Interview Format
MMI
Virtual or not?
Historic Interview Date
Mar to Apr
Learn more
Made for Université de Montréal Medicine 💙🍁

Penn State University

Interview Format
Virtual or not?
Historic Interview Date

Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell

Interview Format
Virtual or not?
Historic Interview Date
Technical support avatar
Tell us what you think. Contact us!