University of Ottawa

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What we know about

Ottawa

's

interview process

Interview Format
Panel
Virtual or not?
Historic Interview Date
Feb

Open-file interview (interviewers have access to your OMSAS entries).

Typical panel question types:

  1. ethical scenarios
  2. acting
  3. personal life experiences
  4. specific extracurricular related questions
  5. curveball questions.
  • They often ask you follow up questions based on your response to put you on the spot and see how you react.
  • Interviews were virtual in 2021, no information has been given yet for 2022. Ottawa consists of a 3 person panel style interview which is similar to UWO.

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Study up on these resources to improve on your answers and stand out from the crowd
Volunteering Pros and Cons
Self-reflection

Volunteering can open doors and create life-changing experiences. For premed students, it's a fantastic way to gain valuable insights, develop essential skills, and stand out to admissions officers. Here's why you should consider volunteering and how to navigate potential challenges.

Pros:

  1. Develop essential skills: Volunteering equips you with vital skills such as communication, teamwork, leadership, and problem-solving, all of which are crucial for success in medical school and beyond.
  2. Gain real-world experiences: Engage in hands-on experiences in healthcare settings, allowing you to observe medical professionals and better understand the realities of the field.
  3. Enhance your resume: A strong volunteering record demonstrates your dedication, motivation, and passion for medicine, setting you apart from the competition.
  4. Expand your network: Connect with professionals and fellow volunteers who can offer invaluable advice, support, and potential job opportunities in the future.
  5. Personal growth: Volunteering fosters empathy, compassion, and understanding, traits that are essential for a successful medical career.

Cons:

  1. Time commitment: Balancing volunteering with academic work and other responsibilities can be challenging. Prioritize and manage your time effectively to avoid burnout.
  2. Finding the right opportunity: Seek out meaningful and relevant opportunities that align with your interests and goals. Research thoroughly and reach out to professionals in the field for guidance.

Embrace the transformative power of volunteering and let it shape your future in medicine. You'll develop essential skills, gain valuable experiences, and stand out in the admissions process, all while making a positive impact on the lives of others.

Report on the issues people with addiction face during the pandemic
Current events

The COVID-19 pandemic has intensified challenges for those battling addiction, as they face increased isolation, fear, and anxiety. Social connections and support services have been disrupted, making it harder for individuals to cope. Despite these setbacks, the pandemic has also inspired resilience and creativity in response to the crisis.

People with lived experience of substance use and professionals in the field have come together to share insights and develop innovative solutions. In the face of adversity, they have adapted by transitioning to online meetings, increasing access to resources like naloxone, and providing better outreach to those in need. Moreover, their collective efforts have highlighted gaps in healthcare and social services, prompting critical discussions around improving support for marginalized communities.

As an admissions consultant for premed students, you can inspire and motivate your clients by emphasizing the importance of empathy, resourcefulness, and determination in addressing the challenges faced by people with addiction. Encourage them to learn from these real-life experiences and be prepared to contribute positively to the field of healthcare and addiction treatment in the future. Together, we can build a more compassionate and effective support system for those affected by addiction.

CPSO reporting guidelines
Bioethics

The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario (CPSO) reporting guidelines outline mandatory and permissive reporting policies for physicians practicing in Ontario. These guidelines are essential for maintaining professional conduct and protecting the public interest. Premed students can benefit from understanding these guidelines as they prepare for their future careers as physicians.

Mandatory reports are legally required and often involve specific information or professional medical opinions. Permissive reports, on the other hand, are based on professional responsibility and ethics, allowing physicians to use their discretion in deciding whether to make a report.

Some mandatory reporting obligations include child abuse or neglect, impaired driving ability, sexual abuse of a patient, and communicable diseases. Permissive reports might involve instances where disclosing patient information is necessary to protect others from harm.

Premed students should familiarize themselves with these reporting guidelines to better understand the legal, professional, and ethical reporting obligations they will face as physicians. By doing so, they can prepare for situations that may require them to balance patient confidentiality with public interest and safety.

In addition, premed students can develop effective communication skills by learning how to inform patients about their reporting duties when appropriate. This transparency can help build trust and strengthen the physician-patient relationship.

Understanding CPSO reporting guidelines will enable premed students to navigate complex reporting obligations and make informed decisions in their future practice. It is crucial for students to consult resources such as the Canadian Medical Protective Association (CMPA), the Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario (IPC), and the College's Physician Advisory Service (PAS) for further guidance on reporting obligations.

Video on social media from Ollie Burton
Health care issues

Social media has revolutionized the way we connect and share ideas, but should doctors be encouraged to participate? Ollie Burton, a third-year medical student, discusses the pros and cons of doctors engaging with social media.

Having doctors on social media presents a unique opportunity for authoritative voices to share health and wellness information with a wider audience. They can effectively communicate complex ideas and reach patients who might not engage with traditional health literature.

On the other hand, there's a risk of doctors spreading misinformation or focusing on building their online presence rather than enhancing their practice. Conflicts of interest, such as endorsing products, can also arise.

As future medical professionals, embracing social media can be advantageous, but it's essential to maintain professionalism and prioritize patient care. The same standards expected in a clinical environment apply online.

So, consider the impact of your social media presence on your medical journey. Use it responsibly to inspire, educate, and connect with others, while always upholding the integrity of your profession. Be the change you want to see in healthcare and foster a positive online environment for everyone.

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