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Casper
Kevin should speak to them privately, in an empathetic manner. He should advice them that it doesn't only hurt the relationship between the worker and the store, but also the store. If the store loses on the bread, they might not be able to pay the employees salary. Kevin should inform the employee that they are not mad, but understanding of the situation. Kevin should direct them to local food banks and other resources that can financially help them employee.
student-501
7
student-501
Casper
Casper
that the act of being open to new knowledge is the only way to continually learn as a person. I think by experiences he learned so many different views and understanding of concepts thta he realized his own thoughts may not be right and thus he should not only question what other say but also his own beleifs.
student-553
6
student-553
Casper
Casper
Whilst I can understand why Richard may want to tell Jessica about the database, in order to help her out, it would not be an appropriate thing to do. By providing Jessica the data base it provides her with an unfair advantage over other students who may not have access and may also be struggling with the course. Furthermore providing the database to Jessica also disadvantages her as she may properly learn the content which could create problems with more advanced units later in her degree. Richar should instead offer to tutor Jessica or encourage her to raise her concerns with the lecturer
student-355
9
student-355
Casper
Casper
This situation would be difficult for Kevin, as he will not be able to find anything he can buy in this store, while staying loyal to his religion. However, it is also not the obligation of the store to appeal to everybody who walks in. As long as Kevin is treated well in this store, this would not constitute of religious discrimination, since after all, Kevin could buy pasta at another store.
student-531
6
student-531
Casper
Casper
I was part of a school project for one of my science courses in university. We were asked to write lab report in a short period of time given all the other course loads. Given the busy schedule, it was difficult to find mutal time. I encouraged the group to divide tasks and work on our own and then meet for the final results. This has helped us maintain positive group dynamics and seucced in the project.
student-609
0
student-609
Casper
Casper
Kevin should speak to them privately, in an empathetic manner. He should advice them that it doesn't only hurt the relationship between the worker and the store, but also the store. If the store loses on the bread, they might not be able to pay the employees salary. Kevin should inform the employee that they are not mad, but understanding of the situation. Kevin should direct them to local food banks and other resources that can financially help them employee.
student-501
7
student-501
Casper
Casper
This is a dilemma since John should respect the law but it's also incredibly important for the lady to make her medical appointment - she may have imoprtant medical concerns that require urgent attention and waiting may cause her to have a poor outcome. In these situations, I think its important to look for alternatives in which both criteria can be met, and perhaps stopping the bus and asking fellow passengers if anyone has a spare ticket to help this woman out could provide a solution. In y experience, people are often eager to help in these cases. If I were in John's shoes, and none of the passengers offer to help, I would either purchase the ticket myself or allow this lady to come on the bus at no charge, as I believe the medical situation necessitates this potential infringmenet here.
student-416
9
student-416
Casper
Casper
Je ne l'empêcherais pas de le fréquenter, mais j'essayerais de contacter les parents de l'enfant riche afin de leur expliquer notre situation, et les conséquences des actions de leur enfant sur le notre (soit un risque de manque de confiance evers lui-même dans le futur, par exemple). J'essayerias de trouver un compromis
student-577
6
student-577
Casper
Casper
I would approach all conversations with respect and transparency. I would also understand that my boss is likely extremely stressed due to the missing money and that the way I am being treated is likely related to that. I would be diligent about my work and ensure that I continue to be on time and offer to help resolve the issue of the missing money. I would also request another meeting to speak about my innocence as I deserve to have the opportunity to explain my lack of involvement with the theft.
student-481
8
student-481
Casper
Casper
For my film class, our final project was to make a film highlighting minorities in Brazilian film. My team chose to focus on the favela to soccer pipeline. Our group leader was Brazilian and more familiar with the topic so he guided us in the process. However, when the presentation day came he showed up late and none of us had access to the final product. The project as a whole as incredibly fulfilling, however.
student-557
7
student-557
Casper
Casper
I would try my level best to wait as much as I could for the station to clear up I would also ask around to see if there is anything else I can do, or maybe take another way to my exam I could also uber to my exam if I had to, because if i get ticketed that would cost me more, and it;s illegal
student-666
0
student-666
Casper
Casper
I would first approach the customer and explain my position as the manager. While ensuring I refrain from coming off as accusatory, I would ask what the issue is in order to try to gather more context. In addition, I would take the employee in private to first ensure they are ok both emotionally and physically. I would then try to hear their side of the story. Lastly, I would report the incident down.
student-357
8
student-357
Casper
Casper
According to me, the quote suggests the importance of being confident. I agree that confidence is the key to any profession. It makes the job trustworthy and knowledgeable. It makes the professional look understanding. In the case of the medical field, patients trust and give more information to doctors who appear confident and know what they are doing as they seem to have more knowledge and experience.
student-338
6
student-338
Casper
Casper
I will first speak to my patient and tell them the dangers of drug use to both themselves and others and advise them to stop taking it. I will also provide them with reoscrs and assistance to help overcome the drug reliance
student-593
8
student-593
Casper
Casper
I do not believe charlie is overreacting. Charlie is genuinely concerned about the wellbeing of his brother and upholding the law. If i were charlie, i would acknowledge my brothers concerns, say i understand he has good intentions, but the permit is required, and is in both you and the customers best interests. For example, if therre is an accident or someone gets hurt, the police know where you are and can provide help since they are aware of the situation. ultimately, i would try to figure out what is stopping my brother from getting a permit (maybe he doesnt know how, and in that case, i would help him) or maybe he just doesnt see the importance, to which i hope my previous response would better inform him.
student-285
7
student-285
Casper
Casper
I did make a promise to Sammy, however, although it would be difficult considering I am his friend, I should probably break it because of the legal implications and to maintain justice in society. It would not be just for Sammy to be unpunished for his crime while another person is. Furthermore, I am not a doctor, lawyer, etc. who has a duty to respect confidentiality. I would therefore have to denounce Sammy to the police if he doesnt himself.
student-310
8
student-310
Casper
Casper
Cheryl should be concered with the wellbeinfg if her patent and the stress it well cause on her firned if she was going to message her about his cancer. It is always important to first gather more information before reaching a conclusion. In this case, it'd be best if she talks to the grandfather and asks him if he wants his family members to know or not since it is his right. If he doesn't want them to know, then it is best that Cheryl doesn't message her friend breach his rights. IF he does, then it would be fine if she messaged her and tol her the bad news and helped both of them with this istuaion.
student-397
7
student-397
Casper
Casper
I would think that someone says this because they could be upset in someway as to say people volunteer and then they leave just because they got their hours. But in many cases that is not the truth some college student want to gain experience in volunteering and no matter what the volunteer in and for how long they volunteered for doesn't matter because they gave up time to do something they did not have to do in the first place.
student-450
7
student-450
Casper
Casper
As I am a student like my friend, and upon reading his work i could tell that he plagiarized, it is highly likely that a prof or TA will catch on to the illegitimacy of my friend's actions. I would let my friend know what I have noticed in his work. I can not assume that he plagiarized so I will need to talk to him to get some context. If he confirms that he had to use outside sources, but tried to change up wording, I will let him know that this is not okay. Not only will it cause a consequence for him in his academics if caught, it also is disrespectful of the efforts of all the students with honest lab reports. I would encourage my friend to reach out to the professor to get an extension so as to complete the report to the best of his abilities, in a manner that is true to his capabilites.
student-124
7
student-124
Casper
Casper
Because I know that they are lying I would talk to them in a passive manner and remind them about the situations of the group. By skipping you are disadvantage the other members who worked hard on their part and I want to show my friend the situations my group members are coming from. Lying is also not a good thing where integrity is important in society and their future. Building trust is a necessary skill and this can lead to bad habits. So I would ask them to come back and work on the assignment
student-459
8
student-459
Casper
Casper
First thing i would do is not assume anything and have a non judental and non confrontational conversation with the student. I will allow them to explain if or why they may have been cheating and if there is a bigger issue going on that is conflicting with their academics. I will also let them know that if they are proven to have been cheating, I have a duty to act by ethical and moral standards and I do have to report her to the proffesor. Acting empathetically and compassionately, I will ask the student if there is any extra help or support that i could provide to better support their academic journey so that they can not make the same mistake again. I will try to actively understnad where they are coming from and remind them that their cheating affects other studwents as it is not fair to
student-37
8
student-37
Casper
Casper
I would first listen to this customer and empathize with their situation. I would then tell them that unfortunately I am not allowed to give them a refund as it goes against our store policy and it would be putting my job in jeopardy. However, I care about their situation and would like to support them to the best of my ability. I would research funding resources as well start a go fund me page.
student-206
7
student-206
Casper
Casper
I work as waitress as a restaurant during the summer and having bee there for several years, I am activiely involved in training new-hires. This involves shadowing, support as well as feedback for new-hires. One summer, I had to provide feedback to a waitress regarding the way they interacted with some of our older customers. Unfortuntealy, she was often impateint and unaccommodating to customers with mobility issues. I approached her after close, in a private setting and asked for time to chat. Then, I made sure she knew i was going to provide some pointers based on what I had noticed this past shift. I made sure to sandwhich the improvement feedabck with positive: \"You did a great job keeping up with the pace of our fast dinner shift today. However, it might be worht considering being more apteint and understanding of our elderly customers. That said, I really appreciated when you ehelped clear my tables and I hope you will come to me for help int eh future as well.:\"
student-166
7
student-166
Casper
Casper
although the healthcare workers, is in the right of deserving respect - i understand where they are coming from. They may be tired, and exhasted but they are not understanding where the person on the subway is comming from. The person asking them to not wear their scrubs in the subway is correct. By wearing the scrubs they might be taking some of the bacteria, viruses from the hospital and spreading them to other places outside the hospital.
student-549
8
student-549
Casper
Casper
This situation could result in both parties, the prankster, and the one getting pranked, to end up upset. I would not want to make my coworker who is planning the prank feel bad about themselves or embarrass them as they do not think what they are doing is wrong. I also do not want to see anybody get hurt both physically and emotionally when the goal of the prank was to have fun. In my mind, I am thinking of how I can help resolve this situation and how to best get involved.
student-585
7
student-585
Casper
Casper
i understand the mian issues here is the own's property right is violated, while the teens are enganing in a really meaningful and purposeful event. as the police officer, my responsbiiblity is to main order of society, thus i would tak on the owner's report and sepak with the teens. I would first gather more information from the owner about their complaint, and speak to the teens to see if this is their first time doing this, were they aweare they are on private property, and is there somewerhe else they can relocate to. If this is their first time and they weren't aweare, i would find the light amount possible according to the regulations, and advice them to see if they can get the fine reimbursed through their organizaiton. otherwise, they they purposely did this, i would fine them more as a warning. i would let the owner know of the turnouts.
student-15
6
student-15
Casper
Casper
I would start off by exploring all my options first in order to decide whether to give the refund or not. I would ask my manager or a person in charge if there was any way to by pass the store policies and make an exepection in this case as it is for a medical issue. If there was no way, I would try to provide the customer with other means or resources to financial help such as government provided resources or help them myself in this situation.
student-306
5
student-306
Casper
Casper
this is diffcult situation and in this situation there are pros and cons for stop charging for electricity,. the pros are that it will allow people to get healthy nutrition as well as help with basic literacy skills by able to to read on the internet without concern for finances. the cons are that it can allows for overuse of electricity if there is no charge and can hurt the countrys economy and the supply. in this situation, there should be an alternative which is to decide based on the family financial status such as low families income should not be charged as much for electricity so that they can satisfy their basic needs, while higher income brackets familties should continue to pay for electricity so it wont allwo for oversue.
student-517
7
student-517
Casper
Casper
Yes. While I understand that confidentiality builds trust between doctors and patients and generally reflects professionalism, I would report the drug use because it is breaking the law. In my opinion, there should be limits to complete confidentiality, such as when the law is broken or someone's safety is at risk. If I didn't report the drug use, not only would this patient put himself at risk of overdosing, but there would be nothing preventing him from sharing the drugs with the other inmates.
student-313
7
student-313
Casper
Casper
There could be many reasons behind the prevailing skepticism. For one, it could be a lack of knowledge or belief in the science behind mindfulness and its effectiveness. It could also be perhaps its simplicity; when connected with the giant of stress one might think \"how can something so simple as mindfulness help me get through this?\"
student-594
7
student-594
Casper
Casper
The hospital has a duty to help meet the medical needs of patients who seek care. This includes consideration of both the patients and staff in the hospital who need to be protected from COVID-19, as well as patients like this individual who is refusing to wear a proper face covering. In this case, the potential consequences of an untreated stroke are catastrophic, so every effort should be made to help this patient safely. If after discussion with the patient, they still refused to wear a mask, ideally, the hospital would find a solution for treating them like placing them in an isolation room and having staff wear additional personal protective equipment.
student-67
8
student-67
Casper
Casper
I am worried about Robert's future at the school and how he may be feeling stressed during this time, due to the high stakes of the exam. I am also worried about the implications of Sarah releasing the questions before the exam, this would hinder the integrigity of the exam and the fairness of it, if some students look at the questions before hand and others don't. If the exam is canceled this would negatively impact those that haven been preparing for it. I would also be worried about the consequences that Sarah would face as a result of behaving unethically. I want to talk to robert to understand why he is feeling worried about the exam so that I can find the best way to support him. I want to talk to sarah to better understand her plans, and if she is in fact planning on behaving unethically, to talk about the implications of those actions to try and prevent her from following through.
student-354
8
student-354
Casper
Casper
While I understand this is a difficult situation, where I do empathize with the student as a TA and feel bad seeing as she has struggled, put the effort in and still felt the need to resort to cheating, I also understand that this behaviour is not fair to the rest of the student body who is not cheating. I would likely single the student out after the exam and inform of what I saw, and tell her that I have to notify the professor about this. I would advocate for the student to the professor and suggest that her reasoning for cheating be explained prior to a punishment being given to her as she may have extenuating circumstances at home that lead to this, Iw Ould explain her history of being a diligent student who comes to office hours.
student-240
8
student-240
Casper
Casper
I would first call my manager and explain the situation at hand. If they say yes, then I would give the refund. If my manager says no I would suggest that we could check security footage to verify if this customer is really the customer that bought the guitar. I would argue that the customer's medical fees are an importatn task that we can help them overcome and that store policy may need to be flexible enough so that we fulfill our moral obligations to help this person. However, if there is no proof that this person is the actual customer I would have to explain to the customer that we cannot refund them because we lack the evidence that they are the real customer.
student-254
7
student-254
Casper
Casper
This one time I was walking through downtown late at night and I saw a homeless person lying on the sidewalk. I just got a gift basket with food from a club I just attended. I knew I had the resources and food to help and I gave they/them the food that I had. I felt. very good about what I did afterwards.
student-349
5
student-349
Casper
Casper
I would start by trying to obtain more information - I want to talk to my friend in a private space and ask how they are doing - they don't have to talk to me if they don't want to but I want them to know that I am there if they want to talk. I would reassure my friend that they have resources at the school and friends that want them to succeed and do whatever that they feel is ideal. I would suggest them to speak to someone at the school that might be able to help them with more options regarding their situation; such as maybe coming back to school later on.
student-327
8
student-327
Casper
Casper
First, I would want to have an open conversation with all my fellow interns to discuss the situation. I would not want it to be a judgmental conversation, but rather one in which we can discuss the use of the facebook page and our companies values. I would give the individual an oppotunity to confess to the post, however, if no one confessed and the situation happened again in the future I would have to inform my supervisor of the situation as I wouldn't want to compermise the companies reputation as it my responibility to control the social media accounts.
student-343
7
student-343
Casper
Casper
I like to be upfront when something is wrong. I would talk up because I would want to fix this behaviour. I am sure that i am not the only one that feels this 2way. It is possible that otehrs are simply afraid to speak up and they need a leader to do so. I would ask them why they make these comments(self reflect) is it possibl ethey might not even know that they are saying hurtful comments.
student-685
0
student-685
Casper
Casper
I think this quote has quite a few flaws as their is so much more to a job then looking like you know what you were doing. This can become an ethical issue as many jobs hold important standards and ethically and legally you should be able to fully understand your job.
student-542
6
student-542
Casper
Casper
Despite our best efforts there may always lie a difference between classes of society. I got busy, didn't get to read this as well as I wanted.
student-712
5
student-712
Casper
Casper
Teamwork can fail due to a multitude of reasons including miscommunication between team members, unequal distribution of work, and lack of team meetings. Communication within a team is very important for its success because, without it, other members of the team would feel out of the loop and will be unable to coordinate effectively to achieve a common goal. Moreover, if the work is not equally distributed then it can be difficult for p
student-246
6
student-246
Casper
Casper
he should first invite the employee to a private room and tell the worker calmly about the situation without any personal emotions, then he should also listen to the employee's point of view and his reason for stealing bread because even though kevin knows the general reason behind the stealing there might be more story in the stealing that he should know
student-494
7
student-494
Casper
Casper
Fist, I would approach Sammy in a very calm way. I would ask him to explain the situation and also the reasons for why he committed the crime. If he suffering from financial issues or has some personal problem, Iwill offer him help. However, I will also let him know that it is completely incorrect that an innocent is getting punished for his crime that would recommend that he go and accept his crime in front of the cops. If he agrees, I will offer to accompany him and support him. If he doesn't, I will have to inform the cops myself because an innocent getting blamed is not morally correct.
student-127
7
student-127
Casper
Casper
If I were her I would ask more inforamtion from Heather on what books she belived she would be mroe confortable being incorpertated into the group. If she has no suggestions, Jnenifer should bring up some recocomdations as long as it is confortable woht Heather to ask what books she perefers. it is also important for jenifer to share her intrest in the club and make it sound as a team effort to get Heather more intrested in finding a solution.
student-498
8
student-498
Casper
Casper
If charging for electricity does not affect the jobs of people that work in the field of supplying electricity, then it would be beneficial to allow for a wider access to electricity. However, if the governments do not have enough money to cover the cost for electricity, it may end up causing more harm to other areas to allot more money for electricity.
student-458
7
student-458
Casper
Casper
My first step would be to look around my surroundings and remain calm. Remaining calm is crucial as it will allow me to think properly and make decisions on what to do next. With a lack of resources and communication, I would try to map out my previous steps to find a way to go back. If I am unable to successfully to this, I will look for ways to get help. I will look for a safe spot with water I can stay at, or possibly leave my mark so others can find me.
student-390
7
student-390
Casper
Casper
I would start by empathizing with my friend and asking him if he plagiarized his work. If he said yes, I would tell him that I will help him the best that I can to finish it with his own work. If I would come from a place of understanding and validate the stress he has been under and would offer to go through the course content with him on a day that we don't have an assignment due.
student-506
7
student-506
Casper
Casper
I beleive that corporate tax being lower is fine however the way that individuals are using it to escape personal tax is a flawed system and there should specific laws that target the misuse of funding yourself through a corporation.
student-535
6
student-535
Casper
Casper
The interpretation of this quite is that people love to know that the person who is performing a treatment on them knows what they are doing. Confidence is key in a job. If you’re not confident the patient will also not be confident. There this quote is trying to emphasize the importance of confidence in doing your job
student-619
0
student-619
Casper
Casper
Firstly, I would check with the company if there are any legal policies on how to go about this. If there were, I would ensure those were followed. As well, I would announce the news in a way that is clear, empathetic and provides distinct next steps. The best way to do this would be to use a clear email that provided this information in a very clear manner. I would include a video in the email where I expressed what happened, and I would make myself available to answer questions as well.
student-102
7
student-102
Casper
Casper
Someone may not agree with this statement because education is not something that everyone has the privilege of having because of unequal opportunities. Some groups may be more disadvantaged in terms of their social and economic situation which may prevent them from getting an education. In other words, individuals can be on a different levels of the socioeconomic status ladder. Not everyone has equal access to education, nor equal opportunity. For example, students that come from families with lower income might not be able to afford an education since it is extremely expensive. These students might choose to settle for other forms of employment with less education requirements and less income/salary made. On the other hand, students that come from a family that makes more income may not have to worry about their education expenses and will have the opportunity to take different education pathways and will have more employment opportunities. As a result, although education is a right that everyone has, not everyone is able to attain it for various reasons.
student-19
7
student-19
Casper
Casper
I was in a group project where the other group members had been previous friends but i was meeting everyone for the first time. They had many inside jokes and would mainly talk amoungst themselves. I felt that the discussions were being made mainly betweeen them and that I was never called upon for my opinion. I could have inserted myself more int the conversation and tried to get to know everyone more but i felt intimidated a t the start of the group project. Additonally, they would work on the project at eachothers house and not invite me all the time.
student-455
5
student-455
Casper
Casper
he should first ask questions to the lady to seek more information how urgent is th emedicla appointment, does she have other modes of transportation available .. once able to evaluate he should try and help with alternate ways of transport if possible but if this is not possibele and it is deemed of urgent matte rhe should allow he ron the bus and then report his actions to a supervisor.
student-623
0
student-623
Casper
Casper
Cultures are what bring people together and make them feel connected to something greater than themselves. It is a way to collaborate with others and create something such as preparing for festivals and make sure that no one feels left out.
student-606
0
student-606
Casper
Casper
This is a tough situation. I understand the decision to try to reduce the thefts by not allowing these students to come in, however they are also limiting a population of customers based on age. Therefore, I would say that although the situation is unfortunate, this is discrimination.
student-487
7
student-487
Casper
Casper
I would approach this person and ask in a nonconfrontation and polite manner why they are putting garbage on the grass, to avoid generating conflict. It may be the case that this person accidententally dropped something in the bin and is simply looking for it. If the person explains that they are trying to find something I would ensure that I remind them to put the rubbish back in the bin when they do find it. If on the otherhand they are throwing the rubbish for no reason I would explain how this shows a lack of courtesy towards maintence staff and memebers of the public,if the person still won't put the rubbish away I would have to explain that I will report them to the relevant aurthorities
student-253
7
student-253
Casper
Casper
Given the major advantages of having new ultrasound machines in the department, it will be tough to convince the hospital to lower the prices. However, it is of upmost importance for loved ones to see their family. Therefore, I believe they should remain the same, and those who can't afford it are given temporary passes that allows them to park for free.
student-681
0
student-681
Casper
Casper
If a government prohibited a practice that was a religious belief, I believe this could be considered religious discrimination. The government may have a reason for outlawing circumcision relating to new research that has been performed that shows there are significant health problems associated with the practice, and therefore this would be a reason they are outlawing the practice, but if there is no medical reason then it could be considered religious discrimination against me
student-97
7
student-97
Casper
Casper
meme si les avantages de la circoncision ne dépassent pas les risques de cette procédure, au moins elles ne font pas plus de mal que de bon. ainsi, si les risques ne sont pas plus grands que les avantages, en tant que gouvernement, il faut considérer que la culture est très importante pour un grand nombre de personnes et donc, je pensequil serait éthique de les laisser faire la circoncision. Ne pas le faire serait alors une discrimination, selon moi.
student-110
4
student-110
Casper
Casper
Je ne leur donnerais pas nécessairement plus de points, j'essaierais plutôt de les mettre avec les autres résidents pour qu'ils puissent se comprendre entre eux et qu'ils puissent décider de comment ils veulent attribuer des points pour que ce soit juste pour eux. Ils pourraient trouver une façon plus efficace d'améliorer le jeu pour qu'il soit plus amusant pour eux.
student-590
8
student-590
Casper
Casper
I would first want to assess my responsibilities in this situation. On the one hand, I hold myself reponsible for the team, its cohesiveness and, by extension, its performance during the championship. If I miss the game without telling anyone, then I can easily imagine them not only performing poorly during the games, but also holding a grudge against their captain. I would therefore want to have a private discussion with my mom, to determine if she really needs me during these trying times. If she says no, then I would go to the championship. If she says yes, then I would have to be frank and open with my team, and try to find an alternative solution. I could, for instance, name an assistant captain for the match, if one has not already be named. It is by evaluating the needs of all parties involved that I hope to resolve the situation in a satisfactory manner.
student-112
7
student-112
Casper
Casper
They may be forgotten because they are less seen by patients and the public. Their work, while extremely important, has a more indirect impact, which could cause people to not recognize their essential role in the system. In society their roles
student-540
8
student-540
Casper
Casper
I recognize that this homeless man is in need of money, and that alerting the passerby may take this much needed money away from the homeless man. However, it is not the homeless man's money and I do not know the financial situation of the person who dropped the money: maybe that $10 is a meaninful sum of money to them as well. I believe I should alert the passerby. If the passerby lets the homeless person keep the money,
student-482
8
student-482
Casper
Casper
I would want to think about the actions I have taken that may cause them to be distrustful of me and then see if I can speak with the boss about the change in the relationship following the accusation. Wanting to feel comfortable and respected in my workplace and provide an equal environment for others is my priority in this situation, hopefully through calm discussion with the boss we could figure out how to achieve this.
student-471
9
student-471
Casper
Casper
I would not purcahse the test bank even though I understand that it would help me to get a better grade in the class. This not the ethical thing to do as schools have polocies and using an test bank such as this owuld go against said rules. I also know myself that it is wrong as there should nvever be a time where one feel the need to cheat in such a manner. If I am struggling with the test I could speak with my professsor to ask for extra help and that way I can do better without the help of a test bank.
student-182
7
student-182
Casper
Casper
I think I will try to say something to my coworkers. Though, I realize that this can be a very uncomfortable interaction, I think that it is best to be open and honest. I do not want to be in a work environment where my coworkers are hostile and are constantly making people uncomfortable. However, I will try to have a conversation with them in a different environment. If we are at a restaurant, the coworkers may be drunk which may cause them to say things they do not mean. I think I will wait for the next day to talk to them and have an open conversation about my concerns. I will do this in a non judgemental way. Just because of a few statements, I will not assume that my coworkers are bad people and give them the benefit of the doubt.
student-106
7
student-106
Casper
Casper
My main concern is for the wellbeing of Dorothy. I would begin by having a private conversation with her, validate her feelings and express that I am here to support her. There is nothing right now that can fill the void left by this relationship, but I am here to be with her through her struggles. I would offer to come over and help her with her day to day tasks, or spend time together so she does not feel lonely. I would also plan a fun event like a movie night or dinner to help her occupy her mind elsewhere and not overthink about the relationship.
student-78
8
student-78
Casper
Casper
My main priority is looking out for jacob. So, i think that although it can come off as rude, we just need to make sure we are genuine, honest, remind jacob of our best interests and talk with him in a nonjudgemental way. Also, we should probably gather more information, for example, maybe he is dieting but today is his cheat day. So, if that was the csas, I probably wouldnt say anything to jacob. If in our private disuscussion he informs me that he is havin difficulty sticking to his diet, I would suggest some palces I know that I really like and are healthier.
student-346
7
student-346
Casper
Casper
Before making a rash decision to report this, I would have to gain more information from the patient, and also understand the challenging struggles of addiction and withdrawals. Although drug use is illegal, and even moreso in a prison, I would not want my patient to have to suffer from medical withdrawals from the drug, nor would I want them to be caused any harm. I would have a frank discussion with my patient about needing to stop the drug use and follow up with them, perhaps through drug testing. If the drug use persisted, I would feel obligated to report this, however, because the drugs could not only be being distributed and causing harm to other inmates, but also would be harming my own patient in the long run.
student-74
8
student-74
Casper
Casper
I would gather more information and can not act based on assumptions. Having someones arms around her does not mean anything significant. It is possible that they were good friends or relatives and went to the bar to get drinks. I would like to talk to Emily privately first and will like to hear her perspective first before informing Daniel of what I think. I would approach this situation with sensitivity and want to make sure that I do not hurt Emily by saying something that is based on assumptions. I would bring the topic by saying that I saw her at the bar that day and wanted to say hey but she left. I would gradually introduce the topic of being with another man. If she brings it up and says that she slept with him or was unfaithful, then I would encourage her to talk to Daniel about it as it is something that can affect their relationship. If perhaps it is a co-worker or just a good friend, I would not go any further and bury that topic.
student-378
7
student-378
Casper
Casper
I would first show her my full support and listen to her concerns, while remaining sensitive and considerate of what she may be feeling. I would then advise her to consider speaking to the manager in private and informing him of her concerns. In addition I would consider confronting the manager to speak to him in private as well and hear the story from his perspective. If it turns out that the accusations are true I would help her in getting the support shee needs whether it be contacting HR or other bodies to help her out.
student-520
8
student-520
Casper
Casper
I would likely give the stranger the benefit of the doubt that this is likely not something that they do on a daily basis so I would not confront them. I would instead wait until they moved away and pick up the garbage and put it in the trash. I do not know what is going on with that person and I am not likely going to change or improve their behaviour by confronting them about it.
student-140
7
student-140
Casper
Casper
dans cette situation, je suis inquiète pour ma collègue et pour les prochains clients. ayant vu que ma collegue semblait avoir bu beaucoup, je serais inquiete quelle ne soit pas en possession de tous ses moyens et quelle risquait sa vie et celle de ses clients en conduisant sous linfluence de lalcool. je serais aussi inquiete quelle perde son emploi sil était révélé quelle ait conduit apres avoir bu, vu que cest contre les règle
student-185
7
student-185
Casper
Casper
My primary concern would be the wellbeing of and maintaining fairness to the employees who will be laid off. i would first want to apologize and remain respectful and understanding of their emotions and feelings that they may experience while announcing the news. I would be transparent about the concern that has been raised, and assure them that i will do whatever is in my hands to resolve this issue as soon as possible so that they can start working at the earliest possible time. I would let them know that I am available if they would like to chat furtherr about this or they have any questions.
student-575
7
student-575
Casper
Casper
I would gather information as why the government would outlaw circumcision and the research behind it. I would feel discriminated as it will be against my religious belief not to circumcise my child. it is important to hom=nour every culture and every belief as long as you are killing or disrespecting anybody.
student-677
0
student-677
Casper
Casper
I think back to a time when I was a waitress at a restaurant. While I wasn't the leader their were often two other waitresses with me on shift and then the owner of the restaurant acted as a leader. Often time when the restaurant was bustling as a group we would have to manage organization of tables, cleaning tables, putting in orders making sure they are correct and checking on each others tables when the other waitresses got tied up with other situations in the restaurant.
student-226
5
student-226
Casper
Casper
This is difficult because one the one side the man is worried about the virus and whether the clothes could transmit the virus. on the other hand the person with the scrubs, feels attacked and suffered probably a lot during the pandemic( long shifts, not able to see their family). Both of them should communicated in a better way, but both sides have pros and cons
student-641
0
student-641
Casper
Casper
I think this is a complex topic. I can see both sides' story. On one hand, lowering taxes for cooperations gives them give them the incentive to stay motivated and keeps the environment competitive. However, lowering the tax for corporations only, creates an unfair gap between lower-income working class and higher-income CEOs. I believe that this gap should be minimized by increasing the tax of wealthy class people when they have reached a certain income.
student-460
8
student-460
Casper
Casper
Einstein probably meant that curiosity is often the driver of innovation and discovery in this world, and that can be a reason why it exists. Humans are naturally curious and this often leads people to ask questions about the world which leads to answers and new discoveries, and ultimately progress in the world. Humans are distinct in this sense that they can directly alter their environment and it could be possible that curiosity allows humans to reach new potentials and heights that could not be reached before.
student-222
6
student-222
Casper
Casper
Since the most pressing issue here is the lack of respect for the people who lost their lives and were affected by concentration camps, I would talk to the teenagers or their parents/supervisors. I need to consider the people affected by this behaviour, including the teenagers, but also everyone present and everyone affected by concentration camps.
student-442
8
student-442
Casper
Casper
I would be empathetic and honest in announcing this news. I'd hold a group meeting, and would let everyone know the circumstances and that we simply don't have the means to keep everyone, or i would. I would explain that I am extremely sorry and that there will be cuts in the future. i would also let them know that i would be available for any questions they may have and would be more than willing to write strong letters for their new jobs if required.
student-167
8
student-167
Casper
Casper
I would first kindly ask if the person took my book or saw the book that I left on the table earlier. I wouldn't jump to any conclusions about theft, because its entirely plausible that the person thought the book was theirs, or maybe they took it to return it to me.
student-20
8
student-20
Casper
Casper
My concern would be my academic wellbeing, given that this final exam may be extremely important for my future, as well as the safety of individuals on the road as parking on the side street may impede traffic. However, If I discern that parking on the side street will not cause harm to others and block the flow of traffic, I would consider parking there in order to make my exam on time. I could also call a trusted friend to pick up my car from the side street while I'm on the subway and drive it to somewhere safer.
student-381
7
student-381
Casper
Casper
I was at a fairly new job and one of my managers got demoted without warning. The situation, we discovered, was because an ex-employee had complained about this manager and our general manager did not take the correct disciplinary action with the manager who ended up getting demoted. I wanted to speak up about how my manager had not done anything wrong in my experience being trained by her, and that my testimony was opposite to the complaint that got her demoted.
student-316
7
student-316
Casper
Casper
No, I wouldn't forbid the poor child from being friends with the rich one, because that would mean that anyone that is richer than you can't be yior friend and thats not have life works.
student-696
6
student-696
Casper
Casper
Socrates quote can be interpretted from various perspectives, however I interpret it as there is often no singular way of knowing, and that growth is the process of learning the acceptance of the unknown
student-519
6
student-519
Casper
Casper
No, following the laws is a perfectly reasonable thing to be worried about. Although Charlie's brother is doing a noble thing by trying to help the hospitalized kids, attaining a permit would be the right thing to do. Therefore, Charlie should make that clear to his brother and try to help him get the permit. If no permit is attained, the stand could be shut down and fine might be imposed. This would lead to having the opposite consequences as Charlie's brother would not be able to help the kids as much as he could have if he got the permit and made the stand a legal one.
student-399
7
student-399
Casper
Casper
I immigrated to Canada from Pakistan. Growing up, I was deeply engaged in Pakistani culture and was never exposed to western media or movies. The only two English songs I knew were by Taylor Swift and Justin Beiber. My parents got a job in a small town in Alberta and we were the only immigrant family there. I felt a sense of isolation and seclusion as I was different from everyone else. Students talked about basketball and hockey during lunch break at school and I did not know anything about those sports. I felt that I did not belong as I couldnt speak English and struggled to fit in due to my background. However, this feeling did not last long. I started to make friends in the next 2 weeks and they invited me to their house and basketball games. I started learning about Canadian culture and overtime felt more included in the conversations.
student-125
7
student-125
Casper
Casper
I believe it would be. I would feel like there is a targeted decision to ban a practice my religious group from a practice they require.
student-528
7
student-528
Casper
Casper
At my job at the recreation centre, I had to assist a patron who was new to Canada, did not speak English, but wanted to learn more about working out. I first asked him about what kind go exercises he wanted to do, and what his goals for himself was. It was difficult as I had to communicate across language barriers and he was not able to communicate his goals. There was nobody around to translate so I had to use google translate, but I wanted to give him the best help possible. I showed him workout and machines an
student-480
8
student-480
Casper
Casper
Many healthcare professionals are not only there for the treatment of medicine, but also teach many residents, medical students and nurses who will take over after them. They will build their knowledge and may form how they become medical professionals. Because of this, many may think that medical professionals should be laid off, as their teachings determine the future. However,with the proper training, these medical professionals may be able to enhance their skills and create a better future. If even after proper training, they cannot teach properly, they should be laid off.
student-669
0
student-669
Casper
Casper
I would hold an in-person company-wide meeting to explain that the company has been less profitable than expected, and that unfortunately, layoffs will need to occur. I would allow employees to express their feelings and opinions, and ask any questions they may have. I would also direct them to additional support, such as counseling or financial resources if lay-offs will affect their emotional wellbeing and/or finances.
student-130
8
student-130
Casper
Casper
It is important to take a step back and understand the roles and responsibilities of everyone involved in this situation. As a doctor, my job is to provide the best care that I can and uphold doctor-patient autonomy. For the institution, their responsibilities consist of ensuring that all rules and regulations of the facility of followed by all inmates. As a patient and an inmate, this individuals job is to follow those rules diligently and not undertake in actions that can be deemed harmful to themselves or others. I would have this conversation with the patient but also try to understand if there were any underlying reasons for them to be partaking in drug use in the prison. Perhaps there is a component of addiction that has been overlooked or just resurfaced. Or perhaps this individual has other sensitive reasons for taking the drugs. It is equally important to bring these reasons to light and provide help, within my scope of a physician. However, it is just as important to ensure the safety of everyone at the facility, therefore the drug use would need to be reported.
student-5
8
student-5
Casper
Casper
I think I would find it understandably difficult to cope with this new stress. I would take a minute to cope with my experience before moving on. I would make sure that I don't overthink and begin to panic and try to leave the feeling for later and try to best rationally deal with the situation at the moment. I would place an emphasis on what I am capable of doing and the
student-215
7
student-215
Casper
Casper
I should first consider whether or not politics has any influence over how I perform my job or how my supervisor performs his or her job. I would try to assess whether or not politicial conversations infiltrate into our workplace and try to professionally suggest that we leave political conversations out of the workplace unless they are relvant to the work we have to do. our responsibily is first to do our jobs to the best of our ability, prioritizing efficiency, positive rapport, and good workplace relationships. if politics disrupts this, i would communicate this with my supervisor and try to fnd a solution to minimize any potential hostile conversations or beliefs so we can all perofmr our work duties well. I would do this with the hopes of staying at my job, but if my supervisor disagrees with me, I will have to work somewhere else where we can prioritizie work performance instead of oilitical beliefs
student-26
6
student-26
Casper
Casper
I would not purchase the test as it is unethical to do so. It will not benefit me in the long-run to purchase these questions and do well in the course, as I would not be learning to my full potential. This is also unfair to my peers who have put in the effort and hard work, as now it is lowering the standards for success. To be fair all around, I would not purchase these tests.
student-332
8
student-332
Casper
Casper
Before I immigrated to Canada, I told my mom that after I settled down, I will come back to take you with me. However, the process of settling down takes much longer than it was expected. When my mother finally got her visiting visa and arrived in Canada six years later, she blamed me for forgetting her behind.
student-558
6
student-558
Casper
Casper
The pros of decreased corporate taxing include increased funds that can go towards supporting employees e.g. improved technology, materials, paid leaves, and allowing companies to function more flexibly. The cons of this include a sense of unfairness between the upper and lower class, and those working may be negatively impacted by continually having money cut from their paycheck. Over all, I believe the cons outweigh the pros, as companies require working employees to function at their best to help the company thrive, and increased taxing of individuals can negatively affect mental and financial health.
student-645
0
student-645
Casper
Casper
This really depends on how he is currently feeling. I would first let me him know this hos feelings are vaild, as the country we live in is diverse and the governevr does have a responsability to be equitbale an equal in how it treats poeple. I would then let him know that I agree with this and that I can help him find a group that is advocaing for this issue in society to be fixed. I would also ask him what he would like to do in this sistuation and do that.
student-699
6
student-699
Casper
Casper
I think this quote means that being a professional does not mean that one cannot make any mistakes or necessarily be the best at everything they do. I think it means that they should do everything according to what is appropriate and not go against recommended or legal practices. Professionals should come to work on time, do their required work, and not go against any professional boundaries. Professionals do not need to know everything and they can go and ask for help, it does not need to appear they know evbeyrhting it is important to act professionally.
student-228
6
student-228
Casper
Casper
I would approach Amy privately and communicate my mistake to her. I would tell her that I really do appreciate the work she does for our company, state the things that she did well, and apologize deeply (telling her that it was an honest mistake).
student-567
8
student-567
Casper
Casper
I would first contact my supervisor and ask to them with ASAP, tellign them know that what I need to dicuss is very important. I would inform them that a post has been made and that the public migh tfind it offencly. I would then should them the post and ask it they would like to take it down ot ==r make a statement about the eror that was make. During our dicussion I was also like them know that I do not know who posted this post but all I know that it was not me. I would also ask if there is anything I can do to help migate the situation.
student-588
7
student-588
Casper
Casper
I understand that John is in a difficult situation. He likely wants to help the elderly lady, given that she has an important appointment to attend, which has to do with her health. However, John does not want to get in trouble by letting the lady onto the bus without paying. In this case, I suggest that John orders the elderly lady an Uber or taxi so that the elderly lady can make it to her appointment. This costs more money than a bus, but the elderly lady could pay John back at a later time. If neither of them can afford an Uber/taxi, perhaps one of them has a friend who can offer the elderly lady a ride. Since the appointment is urgent, it is likely not possible to reschedule.
student-63
8
student-63
Casper
Casper
je crois que cette citation veut dire quun professionel doit avoir lair de savoir ce qu'il sont en train de faire, soit davoir lair compétent, afin dinspirer de la confiance dans leurs clients/patients. un professionel ne doit pas avoir lair perdu tout le temps et doit être confiant en soi meême.
student-136
6
student-136
Casper
Casper
This scenario requires balancing ethics with professionalism. It is unclear the nature of my relationship to my co-worker, if this has happened before, and the overall team dynamic. On one hand, it is unethical to claim someone else's ideas as your own and receive praise for it; speaking up would award praise and credit the right person. On the other hand, it may be viewed as unprofessional to speak up and interrupt the meeting with this issue. I would try to handle this professionally while making it clear that I developed the idea, for example by politely asking Luca questions about the idea that he would not be able to answer, and I could step in to suggest things. I would also have an open discussion with Luca after the meeting about why he took my idea and how we can move forward as team members.
student-34
8
student-34
Casper
Interview
The main reason I really want to become a physiotherapist started when I was young. I played a lot of sports and have always been interested in science. Playing sports, I've had the misfortune of many injuries. Starting around age 12, I've had to go to physio multiple times. I've been to many clinics as I got older, playing lacrosse at a high level and football. I've seen different physios because the teams have different affiliations. So I've had a lot of great experiences with physiotherapists. With my interest in science and studying anatomy and research in high school and university, I've reflected on my experiences and found physiotherapy combines my interests. It allows me to work one-on-one with people at the intersection of anatomy, physiology, physical activity, health, wellness, movement, sports, injury recovery, and improving daily living. You incorporate knowledge, research, and new developments in collaboration with doctors, occupational therapists, and other physiotherapists to create the best plan for each patient. This really interests me. My exposure to different physios provided great role models who inspired me to continue my journey as an athlete and scholar. When I was able to reevaluate what I value, those influences focused me on becoming a physiotherapist. Additionally, my experience coaching and working with kids with autism has shown I work well and communicate effectively one-on-one. I enjoy the process of helping someone improve their abilities and quality of life through movement in a one-on-one setting. I want to put people in a position to succeed. Coaching has allowed me to create positive environments and build relationships with each player to ensure they can improve, have fun, make friends, and gain lifelong healthy skills. These experiences have reinforced and further influenced my desire to be a physiotherapist, as I want to provide this on a daily basis. I think it plays to my strengths.
student-823
student-823
Interview
Interview
In this complex scenario, I would aim to balance public safety and the autonomy of elderly drivers. As someone living with grandparents, I understand the importance of independent transportation for convenience and self-reliance. However, certain health conditions associated with aging may pose risks. Rather than broad bans, I believe driving ability should be assessed case-by-case, perhaps with annual check-ins. This upholds seniors' freedom while addressing concerns. Driving represents vital independence for many older adults. At the same time, declining visual, cognitive or physical health could endanger others if not evaluated properly. Individualized assessments seem the fairest compromise between maintaining autonomy and ensuring road safety. With a thoughtful system of evaluation, we can preserve mobility and dignity for seniors while protecting the broader public.
student-753
student-753
Interview
Interview
As frustrating as it might be to hear a parent does not want to vaccinate their newborn, I believe the parent is still responsible for making that decision for their child. The newborn cannot be considered a mature minor to make decisions, so it is up to the parent. However, I would still do everything in my power to try to convince the parents to vaccinate. I would ask to meet with them and say I understand their concern - there is a lot of misinformation out there and it can be hard to discern reality from folly. I would tell them the facts honestly - vaccinating their newborn will significantly reduce the chance of developing the disease. If after hearing the facts they still believe their newborn should not be vaccinated, then I have to listen to the parents' choice, because they are making the decision for the child. I would need to let the parents decide what is best for their child.
student-816
student-816
Interview
Interview
In our province, I think our healthcare system overall does a pretty good job. With a public healthcare system like we have in Canada, where people are able to get hopefully accessible and inclusive care, there's definitely going to be shortcomings. But overall we see a system where we have our so-called "free healthcare," although we do pay taxes. In any system there's always going to be strengths and weaknesses. But I think overall we do a pretty good job. The issue I'm most passionate about would be accessibility and equality issues, specifically the treatment of indigenous people and people with disabilities. I don't want to make broad, sweeping statements about healthcare in general because it's not every single doctor or health authority that has these issues. But I think with indigenous people in our province and Canada, there have been many instances where they haven't been treated properly and haven't been given the same resources and opportunities to be successful. Some doctors are great, but there have been high profile and likely many unreported cases where indigenous people have not been given the same treatment - whether refused treatments, turned away due to prejudices, or not welcomed in a Western medical environment because as healthcare providers, we're unable or unwilling to accommodate certain values and beliefs. I think this is super important and something we can improve on. Where many indigenous people live in rural communities in BC, I think as a province we struggle to provide good, meaningful, equitable healthcare to people in rural and indigenous communities. It's something they really deserve and I'm quite passionate about. I think it's important that as we move forward, we educate current and future generations with knowledge on how to deal with these issues so professionals are better equipped to go in without prejudice and find solutions that work for both patient and doctor to have a good working relationship that maximizes health outcomes. All cultures and beliefs should be welcome in a healthcare setting by having empathetic people able to go in with no judgment or prejudice, and allow different views and practices that maximize patient outcomes. Having someone willing to listen and create meaningful, non-judgmental relationships with indigenous people in healthcare is key. I also mentioned people with disabilities. As Westerners and able-bodied people, there are barriers we don't think of that prevent access. Addressing those barriers is really important and something I'm passionate about because I firmly believe everyone should be given the opportunity to access our good healthcare system.
student-821
student-821
Interview
Interview
The issue is that I believe this is not ethical at all. I understand the doctor's perspective - they may feel they have created some sort of relationship. However, as a doctor, this should not be allowed. There is a significant power imbalance between the patient and physician. It's uncertain how much real consent the vulnerable patient can provide. This power imbalance contributes to the unethical nature of the situation. Another reason is that it dismisses proper care - the interaction creates bias that interferes with care. Finally, it violates professional boundaries that doctors must maintain as professionals and in a hospital setting. For these reasons, I do not believe it is ethical at all.
student-722
student-722
Interview
Interview
In such a scenario, my priority would be to ensure transparency and come to a collective agreement through careful deliberation with the other judges. Both presentations have very similar, on-par content, making it difficult to choose a sole winner. However, there are other factors the judges and I could consider. One is the delivery and enthusiasm or professionalism of the presenter. Another is the recency and relevance of the proposed solutions to the specific health issue and location of our event. For example, the presentation on access to primary care addresses a pressing issue in our current location. We could also consider the practicality and feasibility of the solutions - something with more profound real-world implications might meet our criteria. By discussing these factors, the other judges and I could thoughtfully decide on a winner through open deliberation.
student-760
student-760
Interview
Interview
Thank you for sharing this challenging situation. I appreciate you thoughtfully considering multiple perspectives - the patient, physician, and broader public. This appears to be an ethically complex scenario involving issues like conflict of interest, professionalism, and trust. I agree the ideal approach is to first have an open, non-judgmental dialogue with my colleague to better understand how this relationship developed. It's important we don't assume ill intent without details. I would want to know if my peer feels they can still objectively treat this patient, and discuss options like referring them to another provider to avoid any conflicts. Ultimately though, physicians should likely refrain from romantic relationships with current patients due to inherent power imbalances. If my colleague is unwilling to cease seeing the patient, I would need to escalate the matter professionally. Our duty is to deliver unbiased care, and an intimate involvement could jeopardize that. However, I would aim to handle this sensitively. There may be personal issues underlying my peer's choices. As physicians, we need to balance multiple duties - to patients, colleagues, and society. In this case, patient wellbeing should come first while also preserving my colleague's dignity. With open communication and discretion, I'm hopeful this situation could be resolved to uphold ethical standards. Please let me know if you need any clarification or have additional questions.
student-831
student-831
Interview
Interview
In this airplane scenario, my first approach would be to politely communicate with the parent and see if they could possibly switch seats with their screaming baby. If that doesn't work, I would offer to change my own seat as an alternative solution. This reminds me of a time during clinical experience when an elderly male patient was giving the receptionists a hard time about long wait times. Since the providers were very busy, I stepped out of my comfort zone as a volunteer with no patient experience and approached the man myself to try and calm the situation. I engaged him in civil conversation, acknowledged his frustration, and asked some questions about his concerns. Though initially still upset, he soon relaxed and we were able to connect on a human level. By the time providers were available, he had completely calmed down and thanked me as he left. Similarly here, though screaming babies can be grating, I would empathize with the stressed parent. If the noise became too much, I would politely communicate and try to find a mutually agreeable solution, whether that's them moving or me switching seats. The priority is addressing the issue compassionately through open communication and perspective taking.
student-787
student-787
Interview
Interview
Physicians are very important in their role of educating the general public about topics in healthcare. This was very evident during the COVID-19 pandemic when there was a lot of misinformation being spread and many people were misinformed about the virus, vaccines, and healthcare in general. There is so much misinformation on the Internet that spreads quickly. I believe physicians are a vital resource and tool for educating the general public about healthcare topics. This is especially true when physicians can make evidence-based claims using research, either their own or others'. Physicians are specifically trained in healthcare, learning anatomy, physiology, biochemistry and other fundamental medical sciences. I think it's a very important role for physicians to use their position and knowledge to educate the general public. If some people don't believe or understand them, it's important to provide information in words a general audience can understand, whether they have medical education or not. Physicians should explain details and provide evidence about healthcare topics using language everyone can grasp. Sometimes, unfortunately, people have preconceptions and don't believe what physicians say. As a physician, it's important to aim to give a lot of information to provide that healthcare resource to people. It's up to them whether they accept and understand that information. Even with strong evidence, some may not want to believe the same thing. That's okay. I think a physician's role stops there - you can give education, guidance and resources but never force someone to believe as you do. Overall, I believe educating the general public about healthcare topics is a vital role for physicians.
student-715
student-715
Interview
Interview
In this complex situation, I would balance respecting the individual's autonomy and recognizing their maturity while adhering to the research team's legal and ethical practices. If the team or local law requires adult consent from someone 18 or older, I would need to explain that to the individual. I would emphasize that I acknowledge their circumstances but must fulfill my obligations by following regulations. This upholds fairness while minimizing harm. My role requires navigating between compassion for their situation and compliance with laws and protocols. I would aim for transparency regarding the consent requirements while validating their capability as much as possible within appropriate boundaries.
student-742
student-742
Interview
Interview
When I was younger, I tried out for many soccer teams but could never make it. The players treated me poorly, saying I wasn't good enough and making fun of me. At the time, I felt disrespected without understanding their perspective. The kids may not have known how to properly treat others and thought it was a joke. What I really gained from that situation is more significant than their actions. I learned to never give up. I kept going and eventually made a soccer team. This experience applies to becoming a doctor. There will be many hard times, so you must keep trying even when you lack confidence. Perseverance will make you a great physician able to provide excellent care. While the teasing was difficult, it taught me an important lesson that guides me to this day - never quit in pursuit of your goals.
student-724
student-724
Interview
Interview
If a patient was interested in visiting an acupuncturist or chiropractor, I would first sit down with them to ask about the underlying issues causing them to seek these providers. It would begin by asking if they have a physical ailment or chronic pain. I would offer to run tests to determine the underlying cause of their pain and establish a beneficial, trusting relationship. We could do x-rays, medical tests, etc. to find the source of their pain and reason for wanting to visit an acupuncturist or chiropractor. If the patient still wished to see one after tests, I would research these fields myself to learn the potential benefits and risks, side effects, or harm to the patient. After doing this research, I would share what I learned and see if any medical staff had advice on things to look out for with these providers, like laboratory red flags or potential side effects. I would also discuss current therapies I'm providing and share my professional opinion that these medications can alleviate their pain or ailment. Additionally, I would ensure the patient knows I'm still there for them. I want to stress I do not want to overstep or lose their trust, and I respect their autonomy to visit these alternative providers. I would let them know if they have any questions or feel something is going wrong, they can still come to me for help. I would be happy to remain their physician and provide benefit if they feel I can. I would just ask them to be cautious and respect their choices.
student-825
student-825
Interview
Interview
My understanding of activism is grassroots movements driven by communities to advocate for policies and programs that positively impact people's lives. I believe physicians and medical students have a role in this duty. As community leaders directly affecting health, doctors can influence public health so patients are cared for beyond the clinic. I understand the challenges. With the demands of staying current on medicine, taking on activism requires great commitment and emotional investment. However, much health progress has resulted directly or indirectly from activism - like reproductive justice advocacy. This promotes not just healthy pregnancies or safe child rearing, but reproductive choice including contraceptive and healthcare access. One way medical students and doctors can engage in activism is advocating for increased access to contraceptives and reproductive healthcare. They can also start public health initiatives to improve sex education, so teenagers gain better understanding of safe sex, changes to their bodies, and reproductive health. Physicians can play a vital role in launching programs to ensure patients get care and knowledge to advocate for themselves. While difficult, activism allows doctors to create positive change beyond treating individuals.
student-738
student-738
Interview
Interview
This is tricky because the patient needs the medication, so it must be administered despite potential side effects. I would first research the literature to understand what other patients have experienced and how side effects were mitigated. Taking a holistic approach to understand the patient's specific needs and lifestyle is key. For example, I have stomach issues myself and make dietary and behavioral changes to alleviate problems that certain medications can exacerbate. After learning about the patient's lifestyle and listening to their concerns, I can offer tailored solutions to manage side effects. To determine if treatment is worthwhile, I would weigh the pros and cons. I would make a detailed list of the benefits and risks to inform our decision. I would also consult other doctors about their experiences managing similar cases. Most importantly, I would have an open discussion with the patient about their preferences and priorities. They have autonomy in the decision, so it must be made jointly. Ultimately, if side effects accompany a treatment that is critical for their survival, I would move forward to provide the best possible care. By researching thoroughly, listening to the patient, and weighing all factors, we can make the most ethical, personalized treatment decision.
student-726
student-726
Interview
Interview
Working at a grocery warehouse was physically demanding. On many days after my shift, I felt like quitting. However, I strived to stay optimistic and focus on the light at the end of the tunnel. What motivated me to keep going back was both financial need and the potential opportunities. I imagined that if I stuck it out, I could build connections with supervisors and managers to eventually move up in the company. This long term thinking kept me from acting on the temptation to quit. With perseverance and networking internally, I was able to gain a Team Leader position which was less labor-intensive than my initial warehouse role picking and packing items. My optimism drove me to look beyond the present challenges and see a path forward. I learned that it's often worthwhile to persist through difficulty if longer term benefits are possible. By overcoming the physical demands through a positive mindset and relationship building, I was able to advance in that company.
student-779
student-779
Interview
Interview
If I've been given responsibility to mediate a conflict between two people in the next room, I would first gather as much information as possible about the situation from both parties. I would make sure to listen closely to each side with compassion, empathy, and an aim to understand both perspectives. I would then ask each party to communicate their ideal solution or outcome. My goal would be finding common ground where neither is harmed and both gain what's most important to them. While I know this isn't always possible, adequate communication and understanding could get us there. As the mediator, I could facilitate this by providing a balanced perspective and allowing each side to fully voice their ideas without interruption, coming from a place of empathy. With this understanding approach, I believe some mutual understanding could be reached.
student-763
student-763
Interview
Interview
Throughout my life, I have helped care for my dad who has multiple sclerosis. His condition started worsening when I was around four or five years old, so I began assisting him at a young age. This experience has greatly developed my empathy. Even when my dad didn't explicitly ask for help, I could sense what he needed whether it was getting comfortable in bed, sitting up properly, or getting a glass of water. I learned to pay close attention to pick up on nonverbal cues. Through caring for my dad, I've become very attuned to others' health struggles and can truly empathize with their situations. There were also times when my dad's condition affected his mental health. During these difficult periods, I made an effort to communicate with him, show empathy, and reassure him that there is more to enjoy in life. He has told me this support helped tremendously, and now he is much happier and positive. I love bringing smiles to people's faces, so making my dad laugh and boosting his spirits is very rewarding. This experience taught me the importance of being there for others because you never know the impact your words and actions may have. I've learned to balance my own needs with caring for loved ones. As a future medical student, these skills of empathy, communication, and trust-building will be invaluable in developing rapport with patients. When patients feel heard, understood, and able to trust their provider, they are more likely to follow treatment recommendations. My lifelong experience caring for my dad has prepared me well for relating to future patients with compassion.
student-776
student-776
Interview
Interview
This is an important issue involving someone close to me, so I need to address it without bias but make clear the seriousness of her actions. I would ask to speak with her privately at a time when she's not exhausted or overwhelmed. Bringing donuts or something to show care, I'd gently ask how much she had to drink to understand what led to this. If heavy drinking is new or unusual for her, I'd want to know more about what caused that. Most importantly, I would advise her to seek out information on the person she hit - visit the intersection for cameras, check local medical centers. She needs to take responsibility for apologizing, compensating the victim's family, and correcting her mistake as much as possible. Drunk driving resulting in an accident is unacceptable. For the future, I would offer to be with her when drinking to ensure she doesn't drive impaired. I'd discuss alternatives like Uber, public transit, calling me or someone else for a ride. She can always contact me rather than drive drunk. If charges are pressed, I would encourage her to admit guilt and accept the consequences. Actively righting the wrong through apology and restitution may minimize penalties. But accountability is essential. My goal is helping her understand the gravity of her actions, take responsibility, and prevent any recurrence, while also providing support as her friend.
student-782
student-782
Interview
Interview
In this complex situation, I would make remaining unbiased and not pre-judging a priority before taking action. I would have one-on-one conversations with my mother and father separately to better understand their perspectives. Using those insights, I would then speak to my sister and brother-in-law to hear their thoughts and stance, since ultimately it is their family and decision. I would offer support, whether financially, emotionally, or by guiding them through the process. My role is to assist my sister and brother-in-law with whatever they decide in the end, after thoroughly listening to all sides without judgment. By seeking to comprehend each perspective, I can provide the most meaningful support to my sister during this challenging situation, while still respecting her autonomy in choosing the path forward.
student-744
student-744
Interview
Interview
Thank you for your question. My responsibility here remains maintaining a positive relationship with the patient and family. If this reflects on my general behavior, it could also impact coworkers and other patients. To understand the situation better, I would first approach the patient, as they are my primary concern. In a comfortable, non-confrontational setting, I would gauge how they've been feeling and if anything is bothering them about treatment or my bedside manner. I would open a conversation to discuss any concerns and assure them I welcome feedback to provide the best care possible. If the patient seems willing to talk, it would be a good opportunity to take any feedback, reflect on it, and apply strategies to better support them. I would also speak to my supervisor to understand the full situation before approaching the family, so I have information on both sides. Again, it would be a private, non-judgmental way to make them feel comfortable explaining their concerns. I want to gain feedback on how I could improve and better support their family. If I can easily fix something that would benefit the situation, I will reflect and try to implement their suggestions to support them through this open conversation. I would also gauge any underlying biases occurring on both sides, like cultural or religious differences I'm not considering, or my own biases against patients - an important self-reflection for any physician. While doing so, I might better understand the family's biases regarding my race, ethnicity, gender, etc. that impact how I implement their feedback. Most importantly, my job is ensuring patient wellbeing. I would encourage and welcome their suggestions and feedback. I would also assure them that if our dynamic is not working, I'm happy to refer them to another physician for treatment continuity, as their wellbeing is my priority. If another physician can interact more positively, I would do so. Moving forward, I would also get perspectives from other healthcare professionals.
student-824
student-824
Interview
Interview
This is clearly a very challenging situation with multiple perspectives to consider. First, I would try to understand each person's reasoning and motivations. I would meet privately with our mother, who opposes the in vitro fertilization, to understand her concerns in a non-judgmental way. Perhaps she feels the process of using a surrogate in India is unethical. I would listen openly, while not validating or invalidating her views. Next, I would speak to my sister to understand why she wants to pursue IVF and confirm she has thoroughly considered the pros, cons and alternatives. While staying at work during pregnancy is a consideration, this is ultimately about starting a family, so I would want to ensure she has reflected deeply on her choice. As her brother, if after careful thought my sister feels IVF is the right decision for her, I would support her as an adult capable of making her own choices, regardless of our parents' conflicting views. I would try to bring everyone together to discuss perspectives openly and foster understanding. My role is to be a neutral party helping my sister feel empowered in her decision-making, while also respecting our parents have strong feelings from places of care and concern. This is a complex situation with emotional nuance around family, career and ethics. Through open communication, hopefully common ground can be found.
student-773
student-773
Interview
Interview
My perspective on our role in activism is that physicians usually act on a more individual level as they're treating symptoms that patients may have. But I also believe that there are many health issues which are systemic, and that physicians should do their part in addressing these issues, maybe even appealing to government bodies when they don't agree with a piece of legislation. But at the same time, their primary responsibility is activism on a patient level. I believe that to be a competent physician, the doctor always needs to have the patient in mind and advocate for the patient's self interests.
student-818
student-818
Interview
Interview
As a physician in a position of authority navigating this complex issue, there are many factors to consider. Rather than directly advising based on personal opinions or biases, I would try to understand the family's full perspective. I would aim to grasp their personal, moral and ethical values, as well as any relevant cultural values. While not imparting any assumptions, I would assist them in whatever path they choose after thoughtful reflection. My role is not to provide a direct answer, but to encourage their process of making an informed decision aligned with their beliefs. By thoroughly listening rather than steering the family in a specific direction, I allow them to determine the course they feel is most appropriate based on their circumstances. My goal is to create an open and supportive environment for these difficult conversations.
student-739
student-739
Interview
Interview
The most important thing is to understand my cousin's level of maturity. For a very young child, I would keep the explanation simple and clear. But for an older cousin who could grasp a more meaningful discussion, I would have a deeper conversation about the benefits of volunteering. First, I would ask about his current opinions to see his existing knowledge. I would challenge him with questions about how volunteering has helped people he knows, to expand his understanding of its community impact. I could use relevant current events or local examples to illustrate how volunteers create positive change. I would tie this to my cousin's own passions. If he loves animals, I may talk about our local humane society that relies on volunteers to provide services. I would help him identify causes he cares about so he can find fulfilling volunteer opportunities, rather than forcing unrelated experiences. Volunteering is most rewarding when you follow your passions. Additionally, I would share my own volunteering experiences and the profound impact they've had on me. Hopefully through thoughtful discussion tailored to his maturity level, I could open his mind to the personal benefits volunteering can provide, just as it has for me and others I know. My goal is to encourage him by educating in a way he can understand.
student-793
student-793
Interview
Interview
The issue of legalizing marijuana in the Canadian healthcare system is complex, with several perspectives to consider. Some potential pros include providing a regulated source to offset potentially contaminated black market marijuana, and easier access for patients who use it medicinally, like cancer patients for nausea relief. Cons could be increased accessibility leading to misuse if public education on safe use and effects is lacking. Dangers like impaired driving are a concern if marijuana use is not informed and responsible. A regulated government source can ensure safety standards and avoid spread of illness from contaminated sources. At the same time, wider access must be accompanied by public education campaigns on potential side effects and safe, responsible use. Strict impaired driving laws should be upheld. If use is informed, overall costs to the healthcare system may be reduced compared to problems caused by dangerous substances like opioids. But appropriate regulation and education are key to maximize public health benefits and minimize harm. There are reasonable arguments on both sides, so thorough assessment of public health impacts is needed if considering legalization.
student-774
student-774
Interview
Interview
This can be a challenging situation. Doctors want to promote life and want their patients to live long and spend time with family. However, we have to consider the patient's feelings and quality of life with a critical condition, which can be extremely difficult. I believe physician-assisted suicide could be ethically appropriate if the patient is making a fully informed decision and is aware of alternatives like palliative care and the impact on loved ones. If after thorough discussion and reflection the patient still feels strongly that assisted suicide is the right choice, and the physician is comfortable proceeding, they should be able to move ahead. The key is ensuring it is truly the patient's autonomous, informed choice, with full comprehension of all options. If those conditions are met, then physician-assisted suicide could be conducted ethically.
student-754
student-754
Interview
Interview
If I haven't seen any problems right away, my instant reaction would be to take a second to reflect on why they feel this way. Are there any specific examples? Have I had these types of complaints before? If not, what potential situations in the past several days treating this patient could have created these issues? Were there times I was tired or had a lapse in judgment with my speech? I would really want to figure out what situations here could have led them to feeling this way, because I would strive for the best bedside manner and relationship with the patient and their family. After reflecting, I would want to talk to my supervisor to find out the specific complaints - where is my bedside manner lacking? What conversations or aspects were not good and where can I improve? I'd want to know if the supervisor thinks it's appropriate for me to potentially have an open conversation with the patient and family to improve the situation. At the end of the day, if they really feel I am not the right fit and there's nothing I can do, then it's about the patient's health and well-being. If they can't be persuaded to allow me to make changes, it may be best for me to step off the case because the patient's health comes first. However, hopefully they'd be willing to have a conversation with me about this. I'd love to not only improve the situation, but also improve myself for the future. I'd love to have a one-on-one conversation to listen to their complaints, figure out which aspects of my bedside manner need changing, and work collaboratively to make a plan for improvements going forward. I am confident in my abilities and would hope to give the best treatment. I would welcome the opportunity for feedback so I can be mindful of the changes they want and take it into consideration. If in the future it's just not a personality match after trying my best to make changes, I would have to move on and take it as a learning experience. I could have a conversation with my supervisor about whether these are ongoing issues for me, where I can improve, and if it was just a one-off personality clash. It's a good skill to be able to adapt, but if after trying to improve I'm still not able, I'll have to move on and continue improving for the future.
student-822
student-822
Interview
Interview
If I found this individual to be problematic towards myself, I might feel the need to bring this to their attention. However, if their behavior is affecting others more than myself, I would consult with them before bringing it to the individual's attention. I would want to engage in a private, open-ended dialogue to better understand their perspective. Perhaps it is a misunderstanding, or they are unaware of being stuck in their own perspective. My goal would be to kindly educate them and help them realize how their actions impact other group members and myself. If they left the group after our discussion, it would be unfortunate to lose a strong contributor. However, I would not feel at fault since I did what seemed necessary after consulting others - it would have been a collective decision. I could reach out after their departure to gain their perspective and hear their side, then potentially rectify the issue by mutually agreeing they return. Or, I may need to acknowledge and accept their departure, wish them the best, and part ways.
student-759
student-759
Interview
Interview
There are many reasons I want to be a doctor, but my personal patient experiences were what first made me want to pursue a career in medicine. When I was 15, I was in and out of the hospital for about a year due to a recurrent parapneumonic effusion. To be perfectly honest, I wasn't the best patient. I was really frustrated because I was a high achieving student athlete. I was missing a lot of school and practice. But I met some amazing doctors who really listened to my worries, my concerns, and they made me feel very understood. I felt like they saw me for the person that I was rather than the situation I was in, and they could kind of see past my teenage angst, and they would joke around with me about when I would rank their nasal endoscopy skills or talk to me about my biology homework. They also helped to develop a treatment plan that would allow me to get back to my training and get back to school. Those experiences inspired me to want to do the same for other people. I want to pursue a career in medicine so that I can make other people experiencing chronic illness or other medical issues feel seen and understood, advocated for during these really difficult times. But with that being said, a career in medicine is very challenging. So I wanted to make sure I explored my options and knew that this was for sure the direction I wanted to go. A couple of years ago, I started volunteering at a family medicine clinic in Stratford. And last year, I completed an internship at a hospital in Peterborough through my program. These clinical experiences really confirmed that this was the path I wanted to take. I honestly can't see myself doing anything other than being a doctor. Through those experiences, I learned how interesting the human body was. It's so complex. But there are also the problem solving skills and critical thinking skills that are required to develop a treatment plan and diagnose patients. It reminds me a bit of a really complex puzzle, putting all of these pieces together for each patient to create the optimal treatment plan. I just think it's so interesting. But also, you have this science aspect integrated with the social aspect of medicine. You're collaborating with a healthcare team. I really value being part of a team. I was part of a team sport for many years, and so I really enjoyed that aspect of medicine. But also you're collaborating with patients. I feel like the social aspect of medicine would keep the job really interesting because you could have ten patients who all have the flu, but your interactions with them are going to be so different because every person is unique. I really enjoy how I can have both the science aspect and the social aspect because I enjoy working with people, and I also enjoy science. I feel like that's kind of unique to medicine. The last reason why I want to pursue a career in medicine is because it would allow me to be a lifelong learner and continue with research. I'm currently finishing up my Master's degree. I'm very passionate about my research, but with research, sometimes you don't get to be the person to apply your findings. In medicine, I could continue with research to some extent and continue with some research projects and stay involved in that research community, but actually get to apply those findings to a clinical setting and see the results of that research, which I feel would be so rewarding. And so that's a huge reason why I would like to be a doctor.
student-803
student-803
Interview
Interview
This is a difficult situation, so we need to consider both perspectives - that of the doctor and the government health insurance program. I believe it is unethical for doctors to recommend circumcisions without clearly informing patients of the risks and downsides, since this is not a medically necessary procedure. Doctors should provide patients with full information about the risks and cons so they can make a fully informed, autonomous decision. On the other hand, the government insurance program (OHIP) is no longer covering circumcisions, which fails to take into account people who need the surgery for religious reasons. The government should be more aware of religious beliefs requiring circumcision. A better approach could be to target coverage for those who need it for religious reasons, while also informing the general public that routine circumcision is unnecessary and carries some risks. This way we maintain patient autonomy but provide access when warranted by religious belief. The key is fully informing all patients and balancing access with education on risks and benefits. This allows patients to make autonomous choices while targeting coverage to those with religious need.
student-720
student-720
Interview
Interview
As a physician determining if medication side effects are worthwhile, I would first consult the patient about their priorities. I would compare the severity of their disease and its impact on their quality of life to how potential side effects could affect their daily living. For example, I would ask if side effects like nausea, weight gain, or depressive symptoms would be acceptable trade-offs for treating their condition. The patient's preferences and values are most important, so I would have an open discussion about whether mitigating their illness or avoiding side effects is more vital for their wellbeing. By eliciting the patient's goals and weighing the risks versus benefits together, we can make the best personalized medical decision. My aim is understanding what matters most to the individual when evaluating treatment options and potential consequences.
student-732
student-732
Interview
Interview
In this scenario with a patient with Down syndrome who is pregnant, my role as a healthcare provider is to advocate for my patient's wishes first and foremost. I appreciate the parents' perspective advising abortion, and will communicate I understand their view. However, I must uphold professional standards and prioritize my patient's autonomy. I would have an open conversation to ensure she has fully considered all options and implications involved. My goal is complete transparency so she can make a fully informed decision. Ultimately it is her choice, and I will support whatever she decides after thoughtful reflection. This reminds me of a high school friend's experience choosing a university. She wanted to attend York University nearby, but her parents pushed for farther options like Waterloo or McMaster. As her friend, I reinforced that this was her decision - she knew what would make her happiest and I advocated for her autonomy, despite her parents' strong opinions. My role was empowering her to make the choice for herself as an adult. Similarly here, while I will listen to parental concerns, my duty is to my patient. I will ensure she examines the situation comprehensively, then back her fully informed decision, whatever it may be. My priority is empowering my patient's self-determined choice.
student-785
student-785
Interview
Interview
Having volunteered in a long-term care home, I understand the difficulty this situation poses, having witnessed patients pass away. While fulfilling your duties, you must remain mindful and empathetic on this sensitive topic. I would approach the family privately in a comfortable setting to offer emotional support and resources. I would also take time to reflect on my own feelings, as this is distressing for staff too. Practicing self-care and speaking with other healthcare practitioners to address my needs is important. My goal is providing compassionate care for the grieving family while recognizing the emotional toll on myself and taking steps to manage that burden as well. This requires an empathetic approach for the family combined with conscious efforts to tend to my own wellbeing during an extremely difficult time.
student-741
student-741
Interview
Interview
The prompt I'll be discussing centers around Dr. Chong, a physician who has been recommending homeopathic remedies for his patients. Homeopathic remedies are an alternative form of medicine involving biological materials from plants or animals. As stated, there isn't enough evidence that this actually works. Furthermore, Dr. Chong himself doesn't believe they work, but he assigns these treatments to patients with mild or subjective symptoms because he thinks they won't cause harm and will provide reassurance. I'm asked to discuss the ethical problems with this behavior. First, Dr. Chong doesn't believe the treatments work but makes patients think they do. This takes away from treatments patients could or should be getting. He's brushing off concerns because he thinks they'll naturally subside. This violates the principle of "first, do no harm." While he may not directly cause harm, he causes patients to not seek other treatments because patients often trust their doctors, especially long-term. So long-term patients may not get second opinions and will take ineffective treatments. It's based on his personal assessment that symptoms are mild or subjective. But misdiagnoses occur, and he puts patients in danger of not seeking other opinions or treatments that could actually help. Under the CanMEDS framework, doctors should be community health leaders, but he is failing by promoting unproven remedies. Even non-patients may start believing these work if they know someone recommended by Dr. Chong. They may disregard other professionals' advice. Dr. Chong has failed as a health expert by giving legitimacy to this medicine. Other physicians may have patients citing Dr. Chong, thinking if he recommends it, it must work. More people may believe in homeopathic remedies even though there's no evidence. Lastly, it works like a placebo, but there's not enough evidence that placebos have the positive effects Dr. Chong believes. In summary, he violates "first, do no harm" by dissuading patients from effective care, fails as a community health leader by promoting unproven remedies, and fails as a health expert by legitimizing homeopathy despite lack of evidence.
student-811
student-811
Interview
Interview
This is a difficult situation since the husband is unaware. If he found out, it could damage their relationship. However, he may already know the truth. I would first approach Linda privately without her husband, since we've confirmed it's her biological son but not his. Due to confidentiality, we can only discuss with Linda initially. I would present the results and ask how she wants to proceed - if she wants me to share with her husband, I can. But ultimately, it is her decision and I would respect her preferences. If she does not want me to disclose to her husband because he is not the father, I would not do so. I have to abide by her wishes given the son is not his. My priority is having an open discussion with Linda first and then honoring her choices on how to handle this sensitive situation.
student-734
student-734
Interview
Interview
Once Brian explains his thoughts and feelings, we can develop a plan. I imagine he would be very upset and heartbroken. I would suggest Brian find support from teammates directly involved to see if they would join him in speaking with the coach. Together they could make the case for Brian to have at least some role they can both agree to. After compiling evidence and support, they would approach the coach honesty. I would help Brian prepare what to say and be very supportive through this process. If the worst case scenario happens and the coach still refuses, I would encourage Brian, though deeply painful, to put this aside for now and refocus his efforts on the Paralympics. Though heartbreaking, the Paralympics are also a globally recognized event to showcase his strengths and gain more popularity to further his career. I would urge Brian to continue working hard, try to move past this for now, and give his all at the Paralympics. This could provide opportunities for the Olympics in the future, while also inspiring others with disabilities with his strength and capability.
student-794
student-794
Interview
Interview
Right, so first off, I don't think it's wise to simply introduce a lower speed limit in a city just because another city did so. Each city is really specific and has its own unique population. In order to determine if a lower speed limit should be introduced in Edmonton, it's important to look not only at the specific routes, but also the demographics of the local population. I think we first need to look at Edmonton's routes to see if there are roads that pose heightened dangers to drivers, similar to what may have prompted the lower speed limit in Plymouth. It's key to understand why traffic incidents are happening in the first place. After analyzing the road conditions and safety issues, I would also examine the population. It could be relevant to see if Edmonton has a large population of young or elderly drivers who may struggle with driving at higher speeds. Other population factors like rates of impaired driving could also influence accident rates. Additionally, it would be prudent to assess road construction patterns and detour frequency. If Edmonton's roads face a lot of closures and rerouting, reducing speed limits could help prevent accidents. In summary, Plymouth's decision to reduce speed limits doesn't necessarily mean Edmonton should follow suit. Each city requires an independent analysis based on road conditions, population demographics, impaired driving rates, construction patterns, and other locality-specific factors. However, Plymouth's experience can provide a model to consider. If a detailed study determines Edmonton faces similar challenges that prompted Plymouth's speed limit decrease, a lower limit could be reasonable for our city as well - perhaps only on the most high-risk roads. The decision should ultimately be based on Edmonton's own traffic patterns, risks, and needs.
student-790
student-790
Interview
Interview
This complex scenario requires a sensitive and compassionate approach. I would disclose the information to both the mother and father together in a private, comfortable setting while being fully transparent, as this is something they deserve to know. However, I would deliver the distressing news with great caution and care given the serious implications for the family. I also believe the biological father should be informed so that future pregnancies are aware of potential risks. Disclosing misleading paternity results inevitably has consequences. My role is to navigate this difficult revelation empathetically and honestly. By choosing the appropriate time and manner to inform all parties, I aim to provide clarity while attempting to minimize the disruption and anguish such news may cause this family. Though painful, they deserve to know the truth.
student-752
student-752
Interview
Interview
In this scenario, my best friend tells me that he is a compulsive gambler and he asks for my money after discussing the broad implications of gambling on society. The first thing that I would do is gather as much information as possible. I will try to ask about his personal circumstances. They mentioned they don't have any money to buy even food - can they elaborate on that? What do they mean by no money? Are they in the negatives or barely getting by? In addition, are they in any form of danger? As of now, they mentioned needing to pay back loan sharks. Are they currently pressuring my friend or potentially threatening them? Third, if they don't have money now, how are they affording housing? If renting or paying a mortgage, how will they pay next month? Lastly, I have to provide empathy, listen non-judgmentally. Gambling addiction is like any addiction - it's very hard to quit, not just a matter of willpower but brain connections. So I want to support my friend without judgment. With that in mind, it's important to think about my friend's family. Have they reached out to family for money? Do they know about the gambling? How is their relationship after finding out? I want to consider their wellbeing and how I can support them too. Lastly, what kind of societal help has my friend sought out? For example, if they can't afford housing, have they reached out for housing aid, addiction counseling, financial aid? What societal help have they received or reached out for? So after gathering information, it's important to decide on my actions. I want to help my friend but not feed the gambling behavior. I will ask them to elaborate on using the money to "win it all back" - does that mean more gambling? I will let them know I'm happy to help pay back the loan sharks so they aren't in danger, but won't support gambling as a way out. So if they agree to pay back loans only, I will give the money. Then I'll try to connect them to addiction resources, financial aid, housing aid, etc. to guide them away from gambling and towards sustainability. That concludes my answer. Please let me know if you have any follow up questions. Thank you.
student-809
student-809
Interview
Interview
Thank you for the question. I distinctly remember the book that initially sparked my interest in what I want to pursue later in life. It was a basic book about human anatomy that I found in 8th grade. It had transparent pages where you could go through the layers of the human body - the skeleton, muscles, and I remember reaching the nervous system and brain. I remember being stunned for a few minutes while reading because to the 13 year old I was, this fundamental brain information was magic to me. I couldn't believe what I was reading, and most of it remains magic to me today. As cheesy as it sounds, it was then that I realized I wanted to dedicate my life to studying the human body, but the brain in particular. I didn't know how or where I'd do that, just that I wanted to in some way. It wasn't until years later when my grandmother fell ill that I saw neurological symptoms firsthand. She had Parkinson's which progressed to delirium. She was hallucinating and saying things that didn't make sense. I had seen people get sick before, but never display neurological symptoms like that. It was disturbing because someone I had known for so long suddenly became someone I didn't know due to changes in her brain. It deeply affected me and remains with me. Later, I decided to shadow a neurologist to witness the field up close. The neurologist dealt with patients with various neurological symptoms. What stuck with me was the position the physician had and his ability to give hope. I think that's extremely unique to a physician's profession. Many noble professions help people, but physicians can give hope. As neuro patients, we face frightening possibilities of our illnesses erasing who we are. So seeing the physician give hope, saying "You'll still be you, you'll survive" had a profound effect. It reminded me of my grandmother and the helplessness I felt. It encouraged me that if I could one day give hope to someone like my past self, I'd be eternally grateful. It reinforced my excitement to potentially pursue neurosurgery at U of T. So in summary, that book sparked my initial interest in the brain, my grandmother's illness made it real, and seeing a neurologist give hope to patients reinforced medicine as the career path to pursue. Thank you for the question.
student-810
student-810
Interview
Interview
The prompt is to discuss gambling in the larger sense and its implications for society. There are a lot of pros and cons to gambling. It is seen as a recreational activity - it can bring people together, give them something to do, be a stress reliever, or just fun if you go to a casino or buy a lottery ticket. Those are considered forms of gambling that can be harmless. However, gambling also has significant downsides in that it can become addictive. Once addicted, it is very difficult to break the habit and can impact not just the gambler but their family and friends. It's difficult for addicted gamblers to see when they cross a line. Addiction is an illness that needs to be treated as such. If someone with a gambling problem asks you for money, it's important not to give in right away. You need to convey worry for what they'll do with the money. Remain calm and not argumentative or accusatory - that doesn't help in these situations. Approach delicately. Recommend solutions - say you're coming as a supportive friend who has looked into resources that can help, some form of rehabilitation may be necessary because you want them to avoid further harm. Identify you're trying to help, not control. Ultimately it is their choice to seek help, but your role is to facilitate that discussion and encourage them to reach out. Gambling can have really detrimental impacts - I've heard of people losing homes, affecting family. I don't think the pros ever outweigh the cons. It can become a very harmful habit. I personally don't enjoy gambling, so maybe I'm biased, but I recognize it can be fun and social for some. Organizations that run gambling have a duty to not promote unhealthy behavior and provide resources for those who become addicted. Friends and family have a duty to each other, and the community has a duty. But organizations like OLG have a responsibility to ensure they don't promote unhealthy habits and provide resources for gambling addiction.
student-812
student-812
Interview
Interview
So why do I want to be a doctor? Well, there are many reasons why I want to be a doctor, but I'm going to tell you a bit about my experiences in the past that really made me want to become a doctor and really motivated me. Ever since I was born, I've had to help my father with his condition, which is multiple sclerosis, and it's always been pretty bad. I've always had to be there for him and to be empathetic towards his situation. It really helped me develop communication skills, but also empathy. Before I could even say something or say what made him uncomfortable, or if he needed to be repositioned in his bed, or if he needed a glass of water, I could just always read his thoughts and I could just feel what he was feeling and provide the necessary care. I could just see, for example, and notice things and I just knew that he needed something. It also contributed to bettering my communication skills because I could just talk to him about how he's feeling and I've always had to reassure him and make him know that it's always going to get better and that he's not alone in this. So I've had to offer a lot of reassurance also. Well, it's part of my day to day life, so I know what it's like to take care of someone. I know what it's like to be in a bit of a medical environment and as I said, it's always been part of my life and so it does not stress me, it does not disturb me. It's actually something I love doing. I love being there for him and being able to just put a smile on his face in any way I can. If it's by giving him a glass of water, then I'm very happy to do so. As I said, I've been there for him and showed empathy and told him that I'm always there for him. Also, when I was little, I had a huge accident with my right arm. After the surgery, I remember speaking with the doctors and they were laughing and they were really making me happy. They teased me a bit about the situation and it just put a smile on my face and it really made me happy and made me laugh. I just realized at that time that it's really who I wanted to be in life, that my goal in life was to just be able to put a smile on people's faces and just seeing people happy is what makes me happy. I felt comfortable, I felt not alone, I felt surrounded and I felt like I could trust them. That's another point I want to mention. It's that I've always gained people's trust easily. So I'm someone that people can count on and I've always gained their trust and for me that's really important. I like being someone who's trustworthy and just so that I can be able to help them, to help them. I also love interacting with other people, I love being social and I really learned a lot about myself and to interact with other people really makes me happy. Also in a more academic aspect. Well, I've always liked the biology course and when I was little I always had this book. It was very interactive and it was about the human body and I remember falling asleep with it every day. I also have a very analytical brain and I love solving issues and problems and it's something that's fun to me but I also always like to understand what's happening before solving a problem but I usually always come to a solution. I also have critical thinking which really helps me in situations and I think it's essential to be a doctor and to analyze things. I'm also very calm, I love reassuring people, I think it's really important to do so. I love offering a calm presence to people so that they feel safe and comfortable with me.
student-798
student-798
Interview
Interview
Patient confidentiality ensures everything the patient tells a clinician is held in confidence. The patient-physician relationship can be strained without trust between them. Having confidentiality breeds trust. As a patient, I wouldn't feel comfortable sharing personal information if it would be shared. Confidentiality makes people feel comfortable opening up - they wouldn't tell these things to others if it could spread. It's so important for trust and the physician-patient relationship. It also fosters patient autonomy, which is important in Canadian healthcare. Ensuring the patient controls what they share is key. As a physician, you need to try to get all relevant information, and patients may not be comfortable telling certain things to family/friends, so they need someone trusted to open up to. That's why it's important never to break confidentiality, unless the patient is at risk of harming themselves or others. If they say something alarming, you have a duty to ensure they get resources needed and involve others to solve the situation delicately. Personally in my clinical experience I haven't had to break confidentiality. My interactions were preparing patients for appointments, performing ECGs, explaining the test - nothing too personal. I have dealt with confidentiality on an engineering team for a satellite launch. We had sensitive design information and signed an NDA. It was tricky later when applying for jobs and wanting to discuss the experience but needing to word things carefully under the NDA. So while I haven't broken confidentiality myself, it's a difficult situation and I recognize the challenges in maintaining it while also caring for patients. But it is foundational to build that trust.
student-814
student-814
Interview
Interview
This is an incredibly difficult situation and likely the worst thing a physician could experience - seeing your patient die after discharge. The family's question about why you discharged the patient is completely valid. First, I would avoid becoming defensive. I would review the case notes, surgery recording if available, and consult other physicians involved in the patient's care to see if any mistakes or oversights occurred. I would do this quickly to get answers for the family. I would arrange a meeting with the family soon after to express my deepest condolences and give them space to share their concerns and frustrations. I would explain my rationale for discharging the patient based on her status at the time. If my review found no issues with her care, I would communicate we discharged her without expecting this outcome. I would do everything possible to understand what happened and be open to an autopsy with their consent. Most importantly, I would not absolve myself of potential blame. I would offer transparent theories about what could have occurred and potential solutions or ways to rectify the situation, even if unlikely to fully assuage their concerns. I would aim to be as open and honest as possible about what went wrong if anything did, or explain our reasoning if not. I would discuss what could have been done differently in hindsight and validate their concerns. There are many potential approaches, but the priorities are avoiding defensiveness, answering all questions, looking for more answers, and being transparent. This is devastating for the family, and no explanation will be fully satisfying. But I would work to help them get the answers they need while expressing empathy for their loss. Admitting fault if applicable and working to prevent recurrence is critical after an outcome like this.
student-770
student-770
Interview
Interview
Hi Jason, I wanted to come over and check in on you. I know how hardworking you are and am aware you are applying to medical school and can imagine how difficult these past few weeks have been. I wanted to ask how you are doing and whether there is anything I can assist you with. I don't want you to fall behind in class and our professor is worried about your attendance. Perhaps we could write him an email together explaining the stress you are under and he may be able to help you by giving extensions or allowing me to bring your work to you. I could also help you find some resources or tools to manage your stress, such as mindfulness exercises or making a scheduled plan. My goal is to support you during this challenging time - please let me know how I can help.
student-718
student-718
Interview
Interview
In this situation with my sister, I would communicate the factors of risk and reliability to consider. There are some red flags around the health of the person receiving the embryo implantation and their capacity to sustain a pregnancy. We'd need to assess if they are being properly cared for and could provide a healthy environment for fetal development. This reminds me of an experience I had when looking to buy a cheap used car on Kijiji during a financially difficult time. At first glance, the low price seemed perfect. But when I mapped the seller's address, it was a sketchy, secluded barn rather than a house. Despite the initial appeal, observational evidence revealed too many risks and unreliability factors. So I decided not to go through with it. Similarly here, we need to carefully evaluate the safety and wellbeing of the person carrying the pregnancy before agreeing to this in vitro fertilization. Can we be fully confident this person is healthy enough to support a baby and provide proper care through gestation? The goal should be minimizing risks and maximizing the reliability of a healthy fetal environment. Just like I avoided the questionable used car purchase, proceeding requires fully addressing these concerns first.
student-781
student-781
Interview
Interview
The issue is that without participants, we won't obtain reliable vaccine results. However, that doesn't mean I or anyone should hastily take an unproven vaccine just because I'm an administrator. I would need to review policies to ethically proceed. Has this vaccine been through animal trials and shown safe for human testing? If not, I would not take it or administer it to others, as that could cause harm. However, if it has successfully passed initial safety studies, we would need to enroll participants in clinical trials under careful oversight. I could enroll myself to ethically test the vaccine's effects, but would not take an untested vaccine randomly. My role is ensuring we follow rigorous scientific protocols to safely develop and evaluate this vaccine prior to any deployment.
student-736
student-736
Interview
Interview
I believe this is a complicated issue with many perspectives on universal basic income. There are pros and cons, but I am more in favor of it as I believe people should be able to provide for themselves and their families. As a physician, this career is about advocating for others, and the ultimate form of advocacy is ensuring people can provide for and advocate for themselves. A basic income is essential for people to be able to do that.
student-815
student-815
Interview
Interview
Today I'm asked a question - in my clerkship, I coincidentally am placed with my best friend. My best friend is continuing to share stories about their patients, calling them by their name and sharing details about their condition as well as their behavior. I'm asked what ethical issues I can foresee arising from this situation. I think right off the bat, the first thing that came to my mind was patient confidentiality. As a physician, you have a responsibility to keep patient information confidential, especially with the public. Another issue I can foresee happening is creating bias in myself. Because we are in the same clerkship and ward, I can foresee myself caring for some of these same patients. Knowing their name, condition, and behavior from my friend's stories might influence my own perceptions and biases before ever interacting with them myself and being able to form my own opinions with an open perspective. The last issue is jeopardizing trust and the workplace environment. If anyone were to find out, this could jeopardize trust not only between my friend and their patient, but also among colleagues and staff. Conversations can be misconstrued as gossip or rumors which can really affect workplace morale. As we're just starting out, we want to make good impressions and really practice those ethical standards we preach. So I can foresee that causing mistrust. However, I think it's important to communicate with staff and have opportunities to debrief and discuss cases, whether with friends and family. But there are ways to do that while respecting confidentiality. In my experience on a suicide hotline, those conversations were incredibly emotional and taxing. Without being able to discuss those feelings with other volunteers, it would have been very challenging to continue. So I think it's understandable to have these conversations and debrief cases with colleagues, but to do so without giving specific patient names or conditions so it remains confidential. I would encourage my friend to reframe the conversation to how they were feeling or if they wanted general medical advice rather than specifics about the patient. As an aspiring physician, collaboration is important to get perspectives on challenging cases, debrief, and take care of our mental health. Diverse perspectives can help patient care too. Perhaps my friend was misreading a situation and I could give a better outlook for them to go back with empathy and provide better care. So collaboration is essential but confidential.
student-808
student-808
Interview
Interview
You know, even though I understand that everyone wants to go and that it's a really great opportunity for everyone, I simply do not have the money to let everybody go. And it is my responsibility to make sure that the trip is well planned and that requires money. However, it's also my responsibility to accommodate members of my team. So I think first, the first thing I would do is speak with my two other colleagues, because I think we have to address the situation as a team, since we are a team, and I would ask them first what they would do in this situation and also explain what I would do. And we can just brainstorm and gather ideas together. Then if we don't find any ideas, I would of course tell the other team members that we have a problem, and I would explain to them the problem, because if I were them, I would not like to be left out of the blue. So I would of course tell them what's going on and also take their input into consideration. If we still don't have any ideas and no one suggested any ideas, then I would actually talk to the university and ask them if we could have another payment for our club so that we can all go, and I would explain to them the situation. I can also collaborate with the other clubs and other universities and ask them if they have other fundings and collaborate with them and ask them where they got their money from. If that does not work, I could also find cheaper accommodations. Like if we have to travel, then I'll find cheaper hotels and cheaper transportation ways to go there. If that still doesn't work, then I would have to sacrifice myself. But I don't think I'll be missing out on much because I would join on Zoom. I would ask the others to film everything and to post them and to call me and film everything. So that would be me along with the five other members who can go. We'd make sure to film everything that is essential. If that still does not work, then I would only let three members go. But who would I choose? I would choose those who can do the most and can learn the most. So I would take the most motivated people, actually. And I created Google Forms, where I would ask questions about everybody's motivations, and I would only take the members who have actually shown interest into the club and who have participated a lot since I'd assume they're the ones who are the most invested and who are the most interested. I would also take the people whose answers were well thought and that I saw they passed a lot of time on it. However, I would also make sure that this is only a one time thing, and I would make sure that for the other trips we're organized, that we have enough money. And I think if we're to this point where I didn't have any money left, it means that I didn't organize everything well. So I would have to check on where I went wrong and have to fix the solution or the problem by myself and with my other teammates. And yeah, lastly, I would just follow up and ask if everybody's okay with the solution. And if they aren't, well, I'll take their criticism into consideration and try to accommodate them on my best. So I just follow up with them.
student-800
student-800
Interview
Interview
In this complex situation, I would aim to uphold my duties as a medical professional while also seeking to understand the individual's perspective. I would have a private conversation to gather details on their concerns with being hospitalized and empathize with their reasoning. Perhaps past hospital trauma is fueling this behavior. Recognizing the motivations behind their actions is key. I would offer emotional support and tailor my approach to accommodate their needs with sensitivity. This may involve being mindful when providing medical advice and directing them to additional mental health resources. My priority is fulfilling my role as their provider while also showing compassion. By listening and gaining insight into their viewpoint, I can better serve this patient in an ethically sound manner that addresses both their medical and emotional needs during a difficult hospitalization.
student-748
student-748
Interview
Interview
Thank you for sharing this difficult situation. As physicians, we have a responsibility to disclose medical information to patients with decision-making capacity, even if family members object. Before acting, I would first meet privately with the parents to understand their hesitations around disclosure. They may have legitimate concerns about their son's mental health that I should consider. However, I would also explain the importance of respecting the boy's autonomy, given his terminal illness. Assuming he has decision-making capacity, he has a right to direct his own care based on his values. Withholding information could damage our therapeutic relationship and trust. I would offer to assess the boy's capacity and, if appropriate, slowly disclose details to him in a supportive manner. This may alleviate the parents' concerns. I would highlight that shared decision-making between us, the parents and the boy would lead to the best care plan. If after discussion the parents refuse disclosure due to risks like self-harm, I may defer briefly. But the boy's right to direct his care should be paramount, assuming capacity. Over time, I would continue advocating for transparency and autonomy in a compassionate, non-judgmental manner. Respectfully bridging this conflict between parents and patient requires patience and care. My goal is to reach a resolution where the boy receives key information while also addressing family concerns. Please let me know if you need any clarification or have additional questions.
student-830
student-830
Interview
Interview
This is a difficult situation that requires considering multiple perspectives - that of the physician dating their patient, the patient themselves, and my own role and duty in this situation. As the patient's physician, they likely see them as a trustworthy source of care. However, physician-patient relationships have an inherent power imbalance, as physicians hold greater medical knowledge, which can unduly influence patients' decisions. This could lead to the physician not prioritizing evidence-based care with this particular patient. As this represents a conflict of interest, it raises ethical concerns regarding patient care at the clinic. Having recognized this issue, I have a duty to address it professionally and calmly, not making any rash judgments. I should initiate a discussion with the physician to outline my observations non-accusatorily. Framing this as a legal and risk mitigation issue may make it easier to convey. Emphasizing our shared commitment to patients' wellbeing is paramount. An alternative could be transferring the patient's care to me, allowing continuity while eliminating the conflict of interest. With trust between us, they may agree this is best. Please let me know if you need any clarification or have additional questions.
student-827
student-827
Interview
Interview
This is obviously a very complex dilemma with no easy comprehensive solution that satisfies all stakeholders. The primary conflict is balancing free speech versus safety and well-being of users when social media platforms restrict or remove content deemed discriminatory or offensive. On one hand, allowing individuals to display any content exercises their right to free speech. However, this risks making parts of the user base feel unsafe or lose those users entirely, which impacts revenue. So platforms have to determine which content is truly discriminatory or offensive enough to warrant restricting. If content is designed to intentionally hurt certain groups, then removing it is warranted. But content not meant to be hurtful, even if offensive to some, requires more consideration before removal. There is no universally correct solution yet, as evidenced by cancel culture debates. Perspectives of free speech advocates and vulnerable groups like BIPOCs and LGBTQ+ must be balanced, which is extremely difficult. Personally, I would prioritize user safety on a social media platform, even at some cost to free speech. If content is likely to be broadly harmful if proliferated, removing it is reasonable. The top priority should be ensuring all users feel safe, welcome, and able to express themselves. So I agree with removing intentionally harmful content. But possibly offensive content requires more discussion before removal. Well-being of all users should be the number one priority for social media platforms.
student-768
student-768
Interview
Interview
Deciding to pursue medicine and become a doctor is a big decision and it requires a lot of effort and takes a lot of time. I have thought very carefully about why I want to be a doctor and I have three main reasons. First, I want to be a lifelong learner. I chose to study at the University of Toronto for my undergraduate degree, particularly in neuroscience, because the field is so broad, there are so many different directions you can go with it. I was able to learn from some of the leading researchers in the field at the University of Toronto. Even after I finished my program requirements and could have just taken easier electives for the rest of my degree, I chose to pursue extra courses at the higher levels, like 400 and 300 level, because I'm really passionate about education. I want to learn as much as I can, and I even took six courses a semester, which is more than usually considered full time, because I wanted to get the most out of the education offered by the University of Toronto and learn as much as I can while enrolled there. Being a doctor is one of the only careers where you get to be a student forever, and you also get to apply your knowledge every single day, which is not something that many other academics get to do. So this is one of the main reasons why I would like to be a doctor. Second, I love forming relationships with people and maintaining them over a long period of time. Even just in the past year where I've been working and volunteering at the same hospital, I've been able to see the same patients every week for a year. It has been so rewarding and fulfilling to be able to see their progress and be able to contribute to their care every week. I think that this is a very unique opportunity. While some other members of the healthcare team are able to form some sort of lifelong relationship with patients like therapists or maybe nurse practitioners, physicians get to do this the most and to the highest level of depth, and you really get to know your patients. I am a person who loves human connection, and I love being able to help people and see their progress as I help them. So being a doctor would allow me to do this every day. Lastly, I'm really passionate about advocating for equal access to health care and equal quality of health care, regardless of one's socioeconomic, cultural or racial background. Currently, I do see some gaps in this. In Canada, even in the place where I volunteered, I found that many of the programs offered were Western-centric and didn't provide as much benefit to patients from Asia, Africa and other parts of the world. For example, I was once shadowing an occupational therapist who was teaching an elderly man with a TBI how to use the kitchen with a walker. Unfortunately, they didn't have the abrasive spices and ingredients that he would normally use at home. Instead, they had eggs, which he actually couldn't eat. So I used my knowledge of Asian culture because of my own background to try and figure out what kind of ingredients he uses in his household. We tried to simulate that with whatever we had, but obviously it wasn't an exact match, and it would have been more helpful to have a wider array of ingredients available. Another example is when doing music therapy, they would often play songs more popular in America and Canada, but not other areas. So when I see Asian patients, I try to ask them what kind of music they're used to listening to, and encourage the music therapist to play music similar to that, so it's more culturally relevant. So I think being a physician is the only profession where I could be a lifelong learner who advocates for people's health and forms lifelong relationships with patients. That is why I want to be a doctor.
student-805
student-805
Interview
Interview
Recognizing such a complex scenario, my priority would be to uphold the integrity and principles of being a practicing medical practitioner while also emphasizing the importance of well-being for myself, my elderly patients and society as a whole. In this situation, I would give myself the vaccine because ensuring my health and safety during the outbreak would allow me to continue working to provide healthcare services to other elderly patients. Not only would I be benefiting myself, but I would be benefiting these patients of mine as well. Assisting these patients is a large responsibility of mine, and I am obliged to fulfill that responsibility. Giving the vaccine to a different person might not be the best option. I would give it to myself.
student-758
student-758
Interview
Interview
This past summer, I had the opportunity to work in landscape construction as a laborer, my first job of this kind. I felt nervous starting out. When I couldn't find retail or similar roles, I took a chance on this position given my active interests. On my first day, it was an emotional toll and I doubted myself, having never done manual labor before. It gave me empathy for those doing this daily. Waking at 6am and working to 6pm was grueling. But I persevered by learning from others, utilizing resources, and pushing through. I stuck with it for a few months. While challenging being new to this work, it was a growth experience. Stepping outside my comfort zone built resilience and appreciation for the hard work done by trade professionals who perform these demanding jobs every day. In the end, I'm grateful to have developed new skills and insights.
student-747
student-747
Interview
Interview
So my understanding of this question is that I'm being asked if it's ethical for a physician to be sexually involved with a patient who initiated or consented to the initial contact. On one hand, I understand that this is a private matter and their personal life shouldn't be scrutinized. However, on the other hand, I think that physicians are in positions of authority, and an intimate relationship can definitely affect patient care. So I think that as a physician, it is their responsibility to really separate their private and personal life from their professional duties. My stance on this would be that if a physician does become sexually involved with a patient, then out of concern for the patient and to maintain quality care, the physician should no longer be their primary caregiver if they want to continue the relationship. However, if they're no longer in a direct patient-physician role and it's no longer a professional relationship, then it could be ethical. As long as the physician is directly caring for the patient, an intimate relationship is not appropriate, because there is an inherent power dynamic that could reduce care quality and be unethical. In medicine, it's not outlandish to imagine situations where physicians need to evaluate how their personal matters and conflicts of interest can negatively impact their provision of quality care. It's really important in these situations for physicians to maintain professionalism, recognize when a personal relationship becomes a conflict of interest, and know when to refrain from actions that could impact their decision-making. Physicians need to be aware of when they should separate their personal and professional lives, or take steps to address any entanglement.
student-713
student-713
Interview
Interview
I can share an experience when I was working at a nursing home during the pandemic and facilitating visits between residents and their families. To give a bit more context, I started in the summer of 2020 working at this nursing home. At the time we had just started to open up visits between residents and their families, but all of the visits were outside and they needed to maintain physical distancing. The schedule for the visits was really tightly packed because people hadn't seen their family members in a long time and so there wasn't a ton of time for each visit - I believe they had 30 minutes. Our schedule was pretty much always full because we only had so many spots so that everyone could maintain physical distancing. It was important that I was bringing residents downstairs and outside to their visits on time so that they got the full amount of time with their family members. That was really important to me because it had been so long since they had seen their family and it's really good for their mental wellbeing. I wanted them to be able to have this time. In an effort to ensure that I was on time for the schedule, I would go up early to their rooms and I made sure that I had enough time to bring them down. But the issue was I wasn't trained on any sort of lifts, so if a patient or a resident was in bed or needed to use the bathroom before going down for their visit, I did not have the training to do that and it would have been unsafe if I had attempted to do that. So I had to go and ask a PSW or a nurse to help me get the resident ready to go outside in those cases. Now, this was difficult because sometimes the PSWs were pretty much always very busy. They had a lot of residents and needed to be doing showers or helping with feeding and so on. And so I felt really badly going and asking for help, but again, I could not do it on my own without jeopardizing the safety of the resident. So I went and I would ask them and I had a positive relationship with the PSWs, so they didn't mind helping, but I could tell that they were very overwhelmed and I wanted to make the process a bit easier. What I did was from then on, I would print off a schedule of the visits and bring that to the nurses and PSWs every morning. It would be posted in the nurse's room every morning so that they knew when each resident was going down to their visits and they could prepare when it was most convenient for them. They weren't in the middle of showering a resident when I was trying to find them to toilet another resident. I also asked them for their feedback - was this working for them? It seemed to be working better, but I wanted to make sure that I was integrating feedback from them. They actually asked me, after their shift change in the afternoon, if I could come up and just give them a rundown of the afternoon visit schedule, which I was happy to do, and that let things run a lot smoother. It also let me get all of the residents down safely to their visits and in a timely manner so they could have that time with their families. It built my relationship and a positive relationship with the PSWs and nurses because I think they understood that I respected their time and I could see that they were very busy. Although I needed their help, I think that they felt respected in the process. I also made sure that I was helping them in return. I didn't want to just be taking and asking them for help. I wanted to ease their burden as well. So I would help them with feeding at meal times and with the snack cart. I would spend time with residents who took a bit more of their time attention wise and just help them out in those ways. I think that's really important in a future career as a physician, because I'm not going to have all of the answers, depending on my specialty. There's going to be times where I'm going to need help from other physicians, from other specialties, and I'll need help from other members of the healthcare team in order to optimize patient outcomes. I want to ensure that although I need help, I am not just taking from others and I'm also contributing to this healthcare team and communicating with them in order to come to the best solution for our patients.
student-802
student-802
Interview
Interview
This question brings up issues of justice and helping those in need. While there is an equity problem among coworkers when some have items taken, I believe the priority should be assisting the person struggling. I would start by calling a group meeting to remind everyone about available resources like insurance plans, breakfast served daily, and supplies like toothpaste. I would ask coworkers for suggestions on improving quality of life in the office and incorporate their ideas. I would also collaborate with colleagues to try and discern who is taking the items, which I assume are not extremely valuable. This indicates someone likely facing financial hardship. I would tell the group that anyone struggling should feel free to speak with me privately so I can offer more support. While noting that stealing is unethical, I would not shame but rather aim to understand their situation. For instance, if it seems to be a diligent employee, I would consider them for a promotion based on merit, not the stealing. I would encourage open communication and convey my desire to help. If it appears to be an outsider stealing, I would add security measures. My goal would be providing financial assistance through office programs to alleviate the need for theft. I would follow up to ensure the person is doing better and offer additional help as needed. The focus should be having an empathetic, private conversation to get to the root of the issue and assist the individual.
student-777
student-777
Interview
Interview
If the club covers the full costs for only three people, the other members may perceive preferential treatment, which could negatively impact working relationships within the club. We could split the money so everyone's expenses are partially covered, but some members may still be unable to afford the trip. To try to cover more costs for everyone, I would propose a fundraiser. Whatever money we raise could help offset more of the trip expenses per person. This approach demonstrates fairness by providing support based on participation rather than favoritism. It also fosters teamwork as members work together toward the common goal of making the trip accessible to all.
student-727
student-727
Interview
Interview
This is an unfortunate scenario, and I'm sorry this is happening to this woman. The absolute first thing I would do is make sure she is physically okay without being invasive since I don't know her. I would visually assess if she has any wounds needing immediate care. After ensuring her physical health is stable, I would speak with her to see if she is emotionally okay. Personally, I would not be alright with someone routinely hitting me. I would want to ensure she understands this is not okay and that she is in a sound mental state. Slowly, I would steer the conversation towards problem-solving. The initial priority is confirming her physical and emotional well-being in this terrible situation. Once that baseline is established through compassionate dialogue, we could begin to address how to move forward.
student-765
student-765
Interview
Interview
As a doctor, your first role is to prioritize the patient and act in the patient's best interests. So of course, if the patients feel as if they want a different doctor, then I would oblige and try to help them find a different doctor that is a better fit for them. However, as a physician, you have a responsibility to be professional and try to better yourself and try to be the best you can be. So I would first reach out to the family and ask them what exactly I might have done wrong and what exactly I could do to be better in situations like this, because I want to learn from my mistakes and be better for the next patient. Maybe this bedside manner difficulty was because I was from a different culture than the patient. So in order for me to be a good health advocate and have cultural competence enough to give equal high quality care to patients from all different backgrounds, I have to try and figure out what the root of the problem is so I can address that problem myself. Lastly, as a doctor, you have to be a good communicator and build a good relationship with your patient and be able to empathize with them, explain things to them in a way they can understand and make sure that they have all the information that they need. So if I was not clear enough or not sympathetic enough to the patient situation, that I need to know so I can adjust my approach moving forward with different patients. I would also ask the family if they would like to give me an opportunity to fix my bedside manner and make it suit their needs better. And if they say no, I would of course tell them that's totally fine, and try to give them options of colleagues who might have the kind of bedside manner that they are most comfortable with and what they're looking for.
student-806
student-806
Interview
Interview
I agree this problematic behavior cannot be justified despite Dr. A's strong surgical outcomes. Fostering disrespect erodes team cohesion, which harms care quality. If staff feel constantly disrespected, they will be less motivated, compromising patient outcomes. Allowing this culture risks trainees emulating such conduct, propagating disrespectful patterns. Treating patients dismissively dehumanizes them, infringing on their rights and dignity. Research shows dehumanization impairs care. Though Dr. A's individual metrics are strong, condoning this behavior will enable greater harm long-term. A disrespectful environment will breed future disrespectful practitioners, eventually degrading care for countless patients. While short-term surgical results matter, the downstream effects of normalized mistreatment pose too great a risk. Upholding patient dignity and nurturing collaborative team cultures must remain paramount. Overall, Dr. A's pattern of disrespect cannot be justified solely by immediate outcomes, as it threatens patient wellbeing and staff integrity in the long run.
student-828
student-828
Interview
Interview
In comparing laughter to medicine, the main point is to emphasize the vital role emotions play in people's health. No matter your medical expertise or technological proficiency, a crucial aspect is empathy. Being able to express kindness, care, and positive emotions through smiling, welcoming body language, and laughter is key - especially with distressed populations like children in healthcare settings. The statement underscores the significance of emotions, which I hope to apply in my medical career. Medical knowledge is important, but emotional intelligence and the ability to connect matter immensely too. This reminder to incorporate compassion and positivity will guide me as I work to improve patients' wellbeing.
student-729
student-729
Interview
Interview
This is a difficult situation because as a physician, I always want to ensure that the patient, whoever they're associated with, is experiencing and having competent care, but also that they feel comfortable with the care that they are given. For them to feel uncomfortable is an injustice. As a physician, I would first in this situation, if they're talking to the supervisor, ask the supervisor if they would be comfortable enough meeting with me again. If they are, I would say that as a physician, my primary responsibility is towards the patient. I will do whatever I can in my power to ensure that your patient care experience is as comfortable as possible. I would ask if they're willing to meet with me in order to discuss how we can improve this relationship and what I can do to ensure that the patient is not only fully autonomous but is receiving competent and comfortable care. If they are comfortable enough meeting with me, then I would meet with the patient and their family. I would say to the family that I will do whatever I can in my power to ensure that you receive competent and comfortable care. I would address any concerns that they may have. I would ask if they were willing to continue with me as a physician, and if they believed that even though I address these issues, if they believed that they would have a more comfortable care experience with someone else, I would put them in contact with another physician, or I would ask my supervisor to put them in contact with another physician. Although in a perfect world, if I was being completely objective and there weren't any issues with the care, then I would want to continue with them being their physician. But if they believe they'd be more comfortable with someone else, the primary responsibility as a healthcare provider is that you give your patients the most comfortable experience that they can have. I would ensure that they are with a physician which can provide them with the care and comfort that they require.
student-819
student-819
Interview
Interview
In this complex situation, I would aim to uphold academic integrity while remaining mindful of my friend's perspective. Since the semester has ended and grades finalized, I would have a private conversation to educate them on why their behavior was problematic and posed an unfair advantage. If they recognize the issue, I would hope we could approach the professor to disclose the misconduct and face the consequences, hopefully preventing future occurrences. I would also consult other friends to gain additional perspectives on addressing this ethically. My priorities are being transparent regarding the inappropriate actions while also guiding my friend with compassion to take responsibility. This maintains academic honesty while supporting their moral development. Through open dialogue and accountability, we can transform this lapse in judgement into a learning experience for growth.
student-745
student-745
Interview
Interview
The core issue here is that if we don't intervene, the kids could continue assaulting this woman, which is highly unethical and dangerous. However, we need more information to properly address the situation. Some key questions: How often do these girls come by? Why are they hitting her - is the woman provoking them in some way? Is she potentially doing something illegal herself? There are a lot of unknowns to investigate first. I would approach the woman privately in a non-confrontational manner and ask for her perspective on the situation. If she reveals she is doing something illegal, I would likely have to report both parties to the proper authorities. However, if she is innocent, then we can look into reporting the assault by the girls to the police or appropriate powers, so official action can be taken. By thoughtfully intervening, we may be able to stop the assaults and protect the woman, which is an important responsibility as a bystander observing violence. But gathering more details first, rather than making assumptions, allows us to respond in the most fair, ethical manner for all involved. The goal is stopping harm while avoiding escalating the conflict further.
student-721
student-721
Interview
Interview
I think that this is a clear scenario of unprofessionalism. As a doctor, I have the patient's best interest at heart and have to follow the principle of beneficence. Although the relationship could be good for the patient, an intimate relationship between a doctor and patient is unprofessional and could impact the patient's care. The patient may be more inclined to follow a certain treatment just because the physician recommended it, which could affect their health outcomes. I would first have a private conversation with my colleague to understand the situation fully. I would not want to jump to conclusions or accuse them of something untrue. In our discussion, I would share my observations and ask questions to learn more, like how long the relationship has lasted, how serious it is, and if they are considering marriage. Based on the answers, I would decide what to do next. There are consequences to my colleague's actions. If it has been a long, serious relationship, I would consult the clinic's ethical policies to see if such relationships are allowed, and under what conditions. If so, I may have the patient switch doctors since it is still unprofessional. Or if they met outside the clinic and plan to marry, perhaps they can continue dating as the policies permit. If it seems more casual, I would encourage my colleague to speak with HR for guidance, and likely end the relationship if HR agrees it is inappropriate. I would follow up to ensure the situation is handled properly, and support my colleague through the process. Ultimately, I cannot make a unilateral decision without considering all factors and clinic policies. But I would aim to address this ethically and professionally.
student-792
student-792
Interview
Interview
In this complex scenario, I would assist these patients by educating and keeping them informed to promote autonomy and engagement in their treatment. The patient-doctor relationship is a two-way street requiring trust and transparency from both sides. When weighing if medication side effects are worthwhile, looking at the harm versus benefit is crucial. If risks outweigh advantages, exploring alternatives may be best. Cost and financial factors are also important considerations. Taking a holistic view and maintaining openness with patients can help find the ideal solution. My role is to provide the full picture regarding treatments so patients can voice preferences and collaborate in decision-making. By prioritizing their well-being and partnership, I aim to support patients in navigating difficult choices to optimize their health outcomes.
student-751
student-751
Interview
Interview
This is a sensitive situation that requires compassion and transparency. As the surgeon who discharged a now deceased patient, the family deserves answers. First, I would thoroughly review the patient's file, my discharge notes, and consult other providers involved to understand the full context that led to discharging her. This will help me better explain my rationale to the grieving family. I would invite the family to meet in person if possible, or by phone/video if needed. Without making assumptions, I would let them express their feelings and ask questions without judgement. I understand their pain and confusion at losing someone they expected to recover. I would walk through the treatment plan, health status at discharge, and reasoning in simple, clear terms. If I cannot fully answer a question, I would connect them with a provider who can. Most importantly, I would acknowledge the enormous difficulty for the family, validating their emotions. I would offer as much support as I can, meeting again if desired, and connecting them with counseling/community resources during this devastating time. My priority is being transparent about decisions made, while also providing compassion and support to help the family through grief over losing their loved one. Open communication and empathy are essential.
student-789
student-789
Interview
Interview
I currently live with my grandparents and use a car provided by my dad for transportation to university - a privilege I really appreciate. However, about a year ago I was in a minor accident with friends late one night after an exam when we went out to celebrate. At first I was hesitant since I prefer early nights, but agreed to bond with them. Telling my family breached their trust, as they disapprove of me being out late. They felt I misused the car they provided for my education. Breaking this news and their disappointment was deeply upsetting. The situation was difficult, but I've persevered and things have improved. Looking back, I should have considered my family's wishes over my friends' social plans. My education is the priority they had in mind for the car, not late nights out. I regret the mistake in judgement, but I continue to work hard in my studies to honor their support. I remain grateful for the opportunity I have been given. The accident reinforced the importance of responsibility in upholding my family's trust.
student-757
student-757
Interview
Interview
If I notice bruises on a 10-year-old patient, I must first understand the cause before jumping to conclusions, just as I would want if I were the parent. I would analyze the bruises, and if I suspect abuse, have a private conversation with the boy to protect his autonomy and privacy. If he shares more about the situation, my priority is supporting him - empathizing, comforting him in my office. I would discuss available resources, though reporting to parents could endanger him further. Since he is only 10, I would ensure he has a support system like another family member he can talk to regularly and somewhere safe to go. His well-being is most important. I cannot leave it at that, as returning home may lead to further harm. So I would try to have a conversation with the parents, not to blame or confront them, but to understand their personalities and what is behind their actions. If issues like addiction, temper, or lack of resources are factors, I can offer help - improving the child's life also means improving the whole family's. I would share my concerns without implicating the child, framing it as my own observations so the boy is not punished. Providing my contact information, I would follow up to monitor the situation closely. My goal is to address this sensitively while prioritizing the child's safety and well-being.
student-795
student-795
Interview
Interview
First, I would greet Jason, thank him for having me over, and have an open conversation. I want to listen without judgment to understand why he hasn't been attending class and how I can help him return. There could be many underlying reasons I'm unaware of. If he's going through a difficult time, I'll offer support to help get him back on track for classes and medical school applications. If it's a lack of motivation or feeling discouraged by the difficulty, I can relate - medical school is challenging. In that case, we'd discuss his goals and ways I can assist, like studying together or working on applications. The aim is hearing his perspective, offering support tailored to his needs, and outlining how we can move forward productively. By having an empathetic discussion oriented around helping him achieve his dreams, I hope to get him back on the path towards success.
student-737
student-737
Interview
Interview
I think this is a very important question, especially nowadays, when there are a lot of causes that are worth fighting for. I think being a physician or doctor, or any sort of medical degree, puts you in a position of authority and power in today's society. Being a clinician is a pretty well respected profession. A lot of what doctors say has a lot of sway in the public eye just because of the education that doctors go through and the innate feeling of trust that we're supposed to have in medical providers. So I think with that comes a lot of responsibility on ensuring that we are educating the public on matters of importance and ensuring that we are using our voices to make a difference, not just in the lives of clients or patients, but also in the general public. Because of this innate responsibility as medical professionals, we can also reflect back on some of the canons medical practitioners are supposed to follow, one of them being an advocate for patients and for people in your community. I think that medical students and physicians have a really strong role in activism as long as it doesn't conflict with the ability to provide care to patients and doesn't increase disparities between marginalized populations. As long as the activism is for a good cause, I think that we have a role in using our knowledge base. Healthcare providers are part of an interconnected team of specialists, and I think using that network is a very important thing to do. For me personally, I think there's always a place for activism, regardless of what profession you're in. This past summer, I was able to work with a lot of hospital lab employees, not necessarily medical practitioners, but those working in the core labs, working on blood, urine, specimen samples. I was working for a manufacturing research position that was in partnership with Hamilton Health Sciences, and we were able to talk to a lot of employees and get their opinions on their work environment and things that weren't very ergonomic or things that could be improved to help reduce workplace injuries in the future. By giving these employees a voice, we were able to advocate for them and focus our projects on creating a better work environment for them. I think that's a really niche take on activism just because you're not working with a very marginalized population, but you are working with people whose lives could be improved. And I think workers having a say in their work environment is important across the board, regardless of what work condition you're in. I think activism is a really important thing, especially if it shows your commitment to your community. If you are working with a marginalized population, I think if you don't advocate for that population outside of work, it doesn't bring you as close to the population you're caring for as it should. Because physicians tend to be in a position of power, they tend to be higher status just because of the nature of the profession. I think that everyone in those kinds of situations should be advocating for those with less fortunate situations. That's just my take on it.
student-820
student-820
Interview
Interview
In this complex situation, I would aim to respect the autonomy of both individuals while remaining mindful of the power imbalance and professional boundaries at play. As a physician in a position of authority, engaging in a sexual relationship with a patient is generally considered unethical, legally prohibited, and condemned by society. I would bring this problematic nature to the physician's and patient's attention - while they are consenting adults, they may not realize the severity of consequences. Since the physician is not directly treating the patient, it may be ethically permissible given their autonomy over personal relationships. However, the physician's role still warrants prudence. I would emphasize the reputational and legal risks so they can make an informed decision, while upholding my duty to caution against potentially abusive dynamics. My goal is to both respect their agency and provide guidance to protect all parties involved.
student-743
student-743
Interview
Interview
I once had a family funeral happening at the same time as a basketball game where I was team captain. I chose to go to the game instead of attending the funeral with my mom, even though it was for a relative she was close to and she wanted my support. When I got home, I realized this was the wrong decision and felt terrible that my mom went through it alone when I could have been there for her. From that experience, I learned I need to prioritize and sacrifice for what's truly important, even if it's difficult. As a doctor, you sometimes have to sacrifice personal time to provide the best care for patients. Having compassion will help not only as a physician, but in all aspects of life. It builds character, integrity, respect, and love for others. My goal is remembering to put people first, as I should have done by being there for my mom during her time of need.
student-735
student-735
Interview
Interview
This is a tricky situation as I understand both sides of the family, and it's a very big decision that will impact many people including the family and baby. I grasp the father's perspective - if she proceeds, she can focus on her career and provide financially for the family. I also see the mother's concern about potential health risks to the baby from in vitro fertilization. I would first approach the older sister privately and non-confrontationally to gather more details on her motivations. I would suggest she research the scenario further to make a more informed choice. I would urge her to consult others she cares about for input. I would offer to help care for the baby if she decides to proceed. This allows us to come to a thoughtful decision while exploring options and impacts. By gathering more information and perspectives, we can support her through an ethical process to reach the best outcome.
student-725
student-725
Interview
Interview
As a patient who has autonomy he does have a right to know what's going on. However, it is important to consider the parents' feelings, as they are closest to their son. I would take time to speak to the parents and explain that their son had asked me to explain his situation, and that I can take it slowly so as to not overwhelm him. The parents may have reservations but by letting them know about how I planned to break the news, and that I wouldn't use medical jargon, it could make their son less fearful of the entire process that he was going to inevitably go through. It would be good to have their input and I would be able to stay in the good graces of both the parents and the child.
student-714
student-714
Interview
Interview
To start off, I would immediately acknowledge the owner's and customer's complaint over the subpar quality of the food. The rationale behind my first action is to hold myself and our team accountable. After acknowledging and addressing the problem, I would speak with the two employees about our performance and how we could improve our cooking techniques. I feel that reprimanding the two underage employees is unnecessary due to the potential impact on morale and their trust in me as a manager. Additionally, I would need to gather information from my team as to why they could not cook the meals properly - was it due to how busy they were, are we currently understaffed during a lunch rush, or did I not train them properly on how to cook a burger? To conclude, I would first apologize to our franchisee on our subpar quality for the last 30 minutes. Then I would inform and retrain my staff or make adjustments to better accommodate our workload.
student-717
student-717
Interview
Interview
The issue here is that if she continues this behavior, she will likely get an undeserved high grade, which is unfair to other students. However, I understand the pressures she faces to get a high GPA for medical school admission. I would approach her privately in a non-confrontational manner to gather more information on her motivations. If it was solely to get a high GPA, I would explain that this dishonest approach is unacceptable, but offer to help her find other interesting courses instead. If she agrees, I would gladly assist in finding an alternative. If she declines, I would urge her to confess to the professor so he can make appropriate adjustments. And if she refuses, I would inform the professor myself. I would apologize to her, but explain I must act with integrity. This allows us to maintain academic honesty while making an ethical decision before she improperly benefits.
student-723
student-723
Interview
Interview
Yeah. This idea of a bonus fee per doctor visit for me, on the surface of things, it does not sound like a really good idea. The reason why is because it will create scenarios where nonadherence may arise. And nonadherence as a prospective physician assistant, I understand how risky and how dangerous that is. By nonadherence, I mean the fact that a lot of patients or potential patients may see that cost and not think that their particular condition is worth going to see the doctor for. For example, an older patient who may experience headaches. A headache could be an underlying factor, an underlying symptom for a much more severe condition like a stroke or some forms of diabetes or other heart disease. So that could create some confusion and that could all stem from that additional cost that comes from those visits. And another way I could see nonadherence coming up in this scenario is through patients just not following through with additional follow-ups, for example, or prescriptions. In my experience, when I was volunteering at a family walk-in clinic in the Peel region of Ontario, I've spoken and had conversations with some patients who did not feel like going through with their prescription was worth it. One person who I was having a chat with a few months ago during the middle part of my journey as a clinical volunteer told me how he had some form of eczema. And there was this cream, this topical cream that was prescribed to him by the physician at the clinic. But he was telling me how because of how expensive and pricey it was, that he didn't feel it was necessary or worth it to follow through with it. But now we can see that and how it's reflected in this scenario where some patients may see that cost and think that it's way too hefty and not follow up with what a physician may suggest or a prescription or another visit or a visit to another specialized clinic. And these are all factors that do come into play when creating this new policy. But one positive impact that I could see come out from this new change could be the decreased wait times as some patients may see that their condition isn't as serious or necessary to visit a doctor. And that could overall in the long run decrease how many patients there are in a clinic at a specific time. But once again, that does intertwine with the negative impacts because if a patient feels like symptoms aren't as serious, where do we draw that line? Where it becomes serious or where it may be part of an underlying disease that may be more serious? So that is yeah.
student-797
student-797
Interview
Interview
In this complex situation, I would prioritize personal safety while looking out for the homeless individual's wellbeing. Rather than chasing the two girls and risking harm, I would stay with the individual, empathize by asking about their situation and experiences. I would inquire if they've raised this as a concern to authorities and offer assistance in doing so if desired. Providing emotional support and legal guidance within my abilities could help. If the individual wants assistance in reporting this mistreatment, I would help navigate that process with authorities. My focus is avoiding an unsafe confrontation while assisting this mistreated person in finding a constructive resolution. Listening compassionately and advising them on options to address this recurring issue is likely the most prudent course of action.
student-740
student-740
Interview
Interview
Before I begin, I just want to thank you for taking the time to listen to why I want to be a doctor. I'm a mature applicant now, and my decision to become a doctor was really something that I wanted to take my time with to make sure it was the right thing for me and explore all my options as a student. I liked the idea of medicine, exploring topics in health and science, but it wasn't until my professional work, education, and volunteer work that I've done as a working professional that really brought me back to medicine and made me realize that it was what I wanted to do with my life. To touch on those experiences as a working professional - right now, I'm a clinical trial monitor with the Canadian Cancer Trials Group at Queen's University. In this role, I have the opportunity to collaborate with research teams across the country on the clinical research that we're doing that is really improving care options available for patients. It's tremendously gratifying to be able to follow a patient's treatment story indirectly as a clinical trial monitor and get to know the best practices that are taking place at each of our clinical research sites. One of the trials that I'm tremendously proud to have worked on was one that improved survival and progression status in breast cancer patients. This was a huge landmark trial published in the New England Journal of Medicine, and has since been adopted as a treatment option for high risk breast cancer patients. I'm tremendously proud to have worked on it and I want to be able to translate experiences like that into a clinical care setting. I want to be able to find ways to improve patient care. One of the things that came to my mind is something that I learned in my part-time course on social determinants of health. I'm also a part-time student - I've taken courses in anatomy and social determinants of health. In the context of my work and existing education, I've really been able to integrate all of these things together into a more comprehensive image of what I think health and wellbeing actually are and ways to address them as a physician. I'm really excited at the prospect of a holistic care model - not only looking at clinical care and interventions, pharmacological and non-pharmacological, but also interventions that address the social determinants of health, like the underlying causes for why people experience the things they do. I think the most important thing, the experience that made me say "this is what I want to do", was working at the COVID-19 vaccination clinics. I think we'll all recall the uncertainty and anxiety people had about COVID-19 and how it was shaping the world. I wanted to get involved managing it as soon as I could, whether with tracking or vaccines. Specifically working in those vaccine clinics as part of that clinical care team was a really gratifying experience. One that I'm tremendously proud to have been involved in something that I'll be able to speak to for the rest of my life. Being told that I'm giving people their lives back by working at these clinics is something that I want to be able to experience every day as a doctor. As soon as I had that opportunity, that was it for me. I knew this is what I want to do. I think the person-to-person interaction is something that I've always loved. The integration of sociological and health factors that I've learned about from my work and school experiences have really brought me to this point where I'm ready to become a doctor, where I know that I want to be a doctor.
student-807
student-807
Interview
Interview
This scenario, where Dr. Cheung is recommending homeopathic medicines to his patients despite the lack of scientific evidence and him not fully believing it either, calls up a number of fascinating ethical dilemmas. Initially, I thought that the doctor’s behavior was considered ethically wrong since he himself didn’t believe in homeopathic medicine due to the scant evidence, yet was recommending it to patients. However, if he communicated clearly about the lack of scientific evidence and how he does not believe in it to the patients, and the patients are aware of it, then it is not ethically wrong. Ultimately, the patients have the rights to be aware of the treatment plans, including the benefits and risks involved, before making informed decisions. So, if the patients are still willing to consent to the homeopathic approach, despite him explaining the risks involved, then going in accordance with respecting patients’ autonomy, this would not be an ethical issue. On the contrary, it becomes an ethical issue when the doctor withholds detailed explanations and information about the approach from his patients. Doing so, he violates patients’ autonomy and isn’t acting in their best interests. Using the psychological effect of placebo to create a false sense of reassurance is considered deceiving and misleading. This jeopardizes patients' trust for this doctor or even the entire medical system since patients may find out that the prescribed drug has no effect in improving their conditions. Hence, by failing to inform clearly about the treatment, he is preventing his patients from making an informed decision about their healthcare. However, this situation leaves out some details that are important before arriving at a final conclusion: [1] Is he doing business with or promoting homeopathic medicines because his name is on the meds? [2] Does he have a financial stake in these drugs? [3] Is he qualified to practice complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to offer this treatment to patients? [4] Did he explore other alternatives within conventional medicine before recommending this approach? If he is doing business or has a commercial interest, it might be unethical for him to be recommending such treatment given that his clinical judgement could be clouded based on his business interest, suggesting a conflict of interest. Moreover, there is a likelihood that patients are easily persuaded as to the “reassurance” of the treatment through trust of an SMC-registered doctor. Hence, it is crucial to keep in mind the patient's autonomy and right to all information of potentially available treatments. In conclusion, it would be unethical for him to be recommending an approach that lacks scientific evidence. It is also equally unethical for him to create a false sense of reassurance for his patients just because he believes that homeopathic medicines do no harm. I would recommend that he stays transparent and be honest with his patients by openly discussing the lack of evidence and explaining the potential implications. Doing so, he maintains the trust and respect of his patients which will not result in misleading “reassurance”.
student-801
student-801
Interview
Interview
That's very true. There are many careers where you're able to help people through different aspects of their life, I think. However, it's not so much that. I think medicine is just in a very unique position where you are able to not only take the latest in science, which is something I'm very passionate about, but you're also able to apply that to the human body. You're able to use that information to help people with their health and to help people who are in their most vulnerable times. So I think it's that combination of using science - the latest science - along with being able to work directly with people that makes me want to pursue a career in medicine. The personal, human aspect is so important to me because I think it's a real privilege to be able to work with people and help them understand what they're going through when they are suffering from an illness. You're able to help them understand potential treatment options and enable them to make the most informed decisions about their care. The opportunity to work alongside patients at such a crucial time is an enormous responsibility, but also extremely fulfilling and rewarding. It's the kind of positive impact I want to have on people's lives. For example, when my grandmother with Alzheimer's was living with us, I took it upon myself to help her with her medications. My grandmother would wake us up around three in the morning, crying and thinking she was going to die. No one could console her until I sat with her and explained that she just needed to take her medication. I was able to work with her, to help her understand why she needed each medication - for her blood pressure and for the Alzheimer's. She took multiple medications and I saw the huge impact it had on her when I was able to get her to take them. It would take a while, but eventually she would take the medication, start to feel better, and be able to go back to sleep. You could see how much it meant to her. And in my role as an emergency room scribe, I get to see physicians connect with patients daily. I observe them use their medical knowledge to help people recover and return to their normal lives. That connection with patients at such vulnerable moments, along with the ability to truly make a difference in their lives, is what I want for my own career. It's something I look forward to as a future physician and that few other careers can provide.
student-716
student-716
Interview
Interview
In this situation, a few social implications of a free needle exchange program would be definitely a positive benefit to the current vulnerable populations that may not have access to clean utensils, may not have the funds or the ability to get SDI checked. They also could be a population of the lower socioeconomic status as often drug users are. And so a program like this would definitely help allow them to give them a space where they can perform activities in a safe manner, although it's a very important way to stress harm reduction. So a medical implication of this would be that the needle exchange program could allow for the reduced risk of HIV transmission, for hepatitis transmission. So that would definitely be a benefit to the population that this program would be targeting. Additionally, this program definitely has the added benefit of providing a physician referral. So it can allow these patients or these potential patients that now they know that their screen has come back positive with something, they might not have a primary care physician or have the funds to go to an urgent clinic. So it would be beneficial that a physician referral is given to the patient because they have somewhere to go to and they know that after receiving this information there is a next step for them. So that could be a good medical implication as well. Another potentially social medical implication of this program could be that the existence of a needle exchange program. Some could argue that this would provide a motivating factor to continue in these dangerous activities. However, it can be also argued that a needle exchange program can help with ensuring that communicable diseases and active infectious diseases actually go down within a population. And additionally for a viable alternative. Some viable alternatives could be pharmacies that hand out or provide clean needles to populations that ask and also a safe place to dispose used needles so that they aren't in the streets or where someone can accidentally step on a sharp needle that's been injected with someone else and prevent potentially transferred for a communicable disease. Additionally, another viable alternative could be free STI testing at local clinics. A lot of states and local regional health programs offer clinics that provide free and anonymous sexual health disease testing. That could also be beneficial as well.
student-826
student-826
Interview
Interview
I believe it is unprofessional for a physician to date their patient. As doctors, we must prioritize our patients' best interests and follow the principle of beneficence. Although the relationship may not directly harm the patient, it could impact their care and health outcomes. My first step would be to have a private conversation with my colleague to understand the situation fully. I would not want to make assumptions or accusations without hearing their perspective first. I would ask how long the relationship has been going on, how serious it is, and if there are plans like marriage. Depending on their responses, I would consult our clinic's ethical policies to see if such relationships are prohibited or if parameters exist. If it is a long-term, serious bond and our policies permit it with conditions, I may suggest the patient switch doctors while allowing the relationship to continue. However, if it violates our ethical code outright, I would encourage ending the affair. For a more casual relationship, I would urge my colleague to discuss it with HR and follow their guidance. In any case, I would provide support through the process and follow up to ensure the matter is handled properly. While sympathetic to their situation, our duty as physicians is to our patients first. We must make choices that promote their well-being.
student-791
student-791
Interview
Interview
The main issue here is the spreading of misinformation or disinformation about the potential causes of multiple sclerosis. We know based on extensive scientific evidence that aspartame does not cause MS. However, dispelling claims like this can be difficult when they contain half-truths - information that is true in some contexts but misapplied. For example, it's true neurons can be overexcited by chemicals, potentially causing cell death. But there is no evidence aspartame causes widespread neuron overexcitation or death, which is seen in MS. In fact, we understand MS to be an autoimmune disorder where immune cells attack neurons. When addressing misinformation, it's important not to be aggressive or dismissive, as that often further entrenches false beliefs. A compassionate, open approach is more effective. Ask probing questions to unravel the flawed logic behind the claims. For example, where did you get this information about aspartame? Discuss the reliability of the source. Explain the actual scientific understanding of MS's pathophysiology and aspartame's effects in clear, digestible terms. While aspartame may be a carcinogen, that's unrelated to MS. It's key to dissociate inaccurate connections. Additionally, proactively address questions the person may raise. If you respond to X question in one way, consider how they could respond with Y and prepare a response. Keep the conversation moving forward productively. Validate their concerns and doubts, while clearly communicating what we conclusively know based on current evidence. If knowledge gaps exist, acknowledge we're still working to fully understand MS's causes but can confidently rule out aspartame. Admitting the limits of scientific knowledge shows we take their doubts seriously, even as we dispel falsehoods. The goal is to listen compassionately, build trust, and have an open, evidence-based discussion to counter misinformation. Not all questions have complete answers yet, but we must communicate accurately what is scientifically known and unknown.
student-769
student-769
Interview
Interview
I'll get right into the prompt about whether physicians should be able to lie to or withhold truth from patients, even if it's for the patient's own good. I recognize this can be a difficult situation, especially with difficult news where a physician may feel sharing information could trigger an undesired response in the patient. However, looking at different perspectives, the physician is involved in care delivery but the patient's perspective must also be considered. If physicians aren't transparent and don't fully deliver information, especially if the patient wants to know, I think physicians have a duty to tell the truth. I don't think lying benefits patients. Transparency fosters trust between provider and patient, which is necessary for the patient to also be truthful. If a physician lies or withholds truth, what's stopping a patient from withholding critical information affecting their care? It gives a sense of practicing paternalistic rather than patient-centered care, and not treating the patient as an equal person deserving respect. Telling the truth fosters trust. It's difficult if not impossible for a physician to fully know how someone will react to news, so just because it's difficult doesn't mean it should be withheld. There are diagnoses where hearing it may do more harm in the moment by causing panic. But the patient still has a right to know. If test results could be false positives, you can suggest more tests be done but still inform the patient. You cannot withhold just because you think it will do more harm than good. Contingencies like mental illness are important - you still tell the truth but may alter how you deliver it through pacing information, softening delivery, etc. But the information itself, I believe patients have a right to know.
student-813
student-813
Interview
Interview
A few years ago, my extended family took a trip to my uncle's secluded lake cottage in Torber Morris, Ontario. We hadn't seen each other in a while, so it was a nice chance to reconnect. There were three families staying in the fairly spacious but isolated cottage. One night, the parents realized we were low on groceries and decided to go buy snacks so we could watch a movie later. Everyone left and I was alone in the pitch dark cottage. I tried to stay calm but was definitely afraid being there by myself. The nearest neighbor was kilometers away, so I had no way to walk anywhere at night. After about an hour, I suddenly saw a light through the living room window and heard footsteps. My heart started pounding and I couldn't breathe. I didn't know who could be out there and what might happen. I jumped up from the couch and cautiously looked out the window. To my enormous relief, it was just the parents returning! This was a terrifying moment, amplified by the remote setting. Being alone in the cottage far from anyone else made every sound seem threatening. While very scary in the moment, it ended up being nothing. But it gave me a lasting appreciation for how isolation can heighten fear and make the imagination run wild.
student-780
student-780
Interview
Interview
From what I understand in the prompt, I'm a physician. A 16 year old patient comes to me and wants a specific procedure. Her parents are in disagreement with that procedure. I'm kind of asked, who do I have to listen to in this situation? This is actually a very difficult situation. The ethical dilemma is here on think. First is autonomy versus being able to make a well informed decision and regarding the family's dynamic. Before I say what I would do, there's many perspectives I have to look at. At first there's a perspective of the patient, the 16 year old. Then there's a perspective of the family as well. And the last perspective is the perspective of the physician with the relationship with both the family and the patient. I'm going to discuss a bit of pros and cons within each perspective. In the perspective of the patient, the patient comes to the physician with trust. They come with, I don't know what the procedure is. This can be a life changing procedure. It can be a procedure that can enhance confidence. It can be a procedure that can treat an illness. Depending on the situation, I think if a patient comes to you with trust, that trust should be taken without the most importance. By accepting that procedure and doing it for the 16 year old, you're allowing them to keep having that confidence of physicians. If you don't do that treatment, you can possibly hinder a future relationship with the physician because the 60 year old might be upset and might not want to seek medical attention anymore. These are important things to consider. The family's perspective, I think it's a very similar perspective to the child. I know that in most cases, a family really wants what's best for their child. I know that they're looking out for the best interest of their child. We have to understand that maybe they're scared of this procedure. Maybe they don't know what the procedure entails and what the actual reason behind why the 16 year old wants that procedure. Lastly, it's the physician. The physician, I think, in this situation has to be well informed of the decision he's taking, because he has to make sure that the patient is well informed, that the family is well informed, that he tries his best to keep the relationship as positive as possible through this whole interaction with the disagreement within the family. For what I would do, if I were to listen to the patient or the family, this is very contextual based. I have to speak with the patient. I have to determine and see if they're in the mental capacity to make such decisions on their own. I have to understand if they understand the risk and complications of the procedure. I also have to see if this is a medically necessary treatment as it might not even be medically necessary. I have to gather that information. I have to know the reasoning of why my patient wants to have this procedure and if they're in the consent, if they're in the capacity to make the decision. If I can tell they're mature enough to make that choice on their own, I don't know if there's an age of consent in Canada, but I would grant that procedure to that patient should it be legal. Now, if they're not in the capacity and they don't understand what's going on and they want to do it for unnecessary reasons and put unnecessary risk on their body, and I can cause kind of harm to them by doing this procedure, I would not offer the treatment and not because I would listen to the family, but because I don't think it's the right course of action medically. But in either case, I think the approach I would take is to see if they're well informed, if they have the capacity to make that decision. After I make that choice, regardless of the choice, I will show that I still care for the patient. I will remain as a kind of shoulder to lean on for knowledge after the procedure to give them access to post depends if it's operations like post operative care or follow up procedures or follow up visits to see if that procedure went well. I will also speak with the family and let them know why I made my choice, that I didn't just do it to undermine them, but I did it because I believe that that procedure was medically necessary and that their child had the capacity to make that choice. But in large, I would try to keep my relationship with both the patient and the family as positive as possible as this may have long term implications on them wanting to seek medical attention and it can have long term negative consequences if I don't maintain that relationship, if they trust in the medical system.
student-832
student-832
Interview
Interview
This is a sensitive situation, as public health should be the top priority, yet tracking individuals' movements can impose major privacy risks that make citizens feel exposed. Given these competing concerns, the best approach may be finding alternative public health measures that lower disease spread while respecting privacy. Suggestions already implemented worldwide include masking mandates, vaccination requirements, social distancing, and limits on gatherings. While controversial, dissecting perspectives on why they help can build understanding. Officials can share unbiased data on masks, hygiene and distancing to educate citizens that these measures effectively reduce transmission based on evidence. It's also key to remind the public of the goal - reducing illnesses, hospitalizations and deaths. With limited hospital capacity, surging cases can overburden healthcare workers and restrict care for other emergencies. By informing citizens of these broad implications, they may better comprehend the purpose of safety measures despite privacy tradeoffs. In summary, educating the public with clear evidence-based rationale for interventions can promote informed choices. Citizens may then continue safety practices willingly, knowing the societal benefits, while retaining autonomy over health decisions and minimizing invasive tracking. A thoughtful public health approach requires openness on all sides to find solutions.
student-766
student-766
Interview
Interview
This is a difficult situation, as the athlete plans to use prohibited anabolic steroids to train for competition. However, my role as this family's physician is to provide the best care regardless of circumstances. I would first have a private conversation asking what he knows about steroid use - both medically and in terms of athletic consequences. It's important to ensure he fully comprehends the potential long-term health risks that could hinder his quality of life. This conversation can create an open environment for him to ask questions and voice concerns, which I would try to answer or consult a specialist if needed. By establishing this relationship and addressing his questions, I aim to create a space where he knows I want to help. As his longtime physician with knowledge of his history, I would share that I'm willing to continue treating him. If he proceeds with steroids, I would monitor his health impacts - though ethically complex, it's key as a physician to approach with an open mind to provide the best care. While steroid use may be prohibited and concerning, my priority is this patient's well-being. By having an open dialogue, I can ensure he makes an informed choice and feels comfortable coming to me for care, even if I cannot condone his actions.
student-767
student-767
Interview
Interview
I don't believe reaching a certain age alone is reason enough to require someone to give up driving. Doing so restricts their freedom and autonomy which can negatively impact the patient-provider relationship. As a prospective healthcare provider, I aim to treat people equally regardless of age, gender or other factors. This perspective comes in part from an experience I had volunteering at a family medicine clinic. An elderly patient in his 80s came in with his adult son. My fellow volunteer, who was around my age, spoke only to the son as if the elderly man couldn't express himself. I could see the change in the elderly man's demeanor as he apparently felt dismissed and limited. This illustrated to me that we shouldn't make assumptions about capabilities based solely on advanced age. Where do we draw the line about being too old or too young? Imposing restrictions due to age alone can lead to inequalities. I strive to avoid discrimination and value each individual while providing care.
student-778
student-778
Interview
Interview
Leadership and communication skills are invaluable for healthcare providers. In my experience, the ability to communicate effectively engenders trust and rapport with patients. Skilled communicators can understand patients’ perspectives and establish meaningful relationships. Early in my volunteering at a family clinic, I recognized a need for better teamwork among volunteers. At first, we barely knew each other’s names. I decided to hold a meeting for us to introduce ourselves, share experiences, and align on how to collaborate productively. Although we each had leadership abilities, bringing them together enabled joint decision-making and unity. After coming together as a team, we worked much more efficiently. One doctor even noticed the dramatic improvement in our teamwork. We created a “code blue” to call for assistance when needed. Our meetings enabled understanding of each role, and incorporating our strengths allowed effective collaboration. Developing our individual leadership skills while also bonding as a unit was deeply inspiring. This experience showed me the tremendous value of communication, leadership, and teamwork in healthcare roles. It is something I will carry forward in my career.
student-786
student-786
Interview
Interview
I think there are several potential ethical issues in this scenario that should be addressed. The first step would be to speak privately with the attending physician, in a respectful manner, after the exam. I would start by asking if the patient consented to having students present for the intimate exam. Even if consent was obtained, I felt the patient looked uncomfortable when asked to lift her shirt with us in the room. Sensitive exams require direct consent from the patient, which wasn't clearly obtained here. I would explain my perspective - that getting the patient's explicit consent and ensuring her comfort should be the priority. However, I would listen openly if the attending has a different viewpoint, given their greater experience. If we cannot agree, I may need to raise the issue to a supervisor, as a last resort. As a student, I have limited power in this situation. If I felt very uncomfortable with the lack of consent and wished to leave but was refused, that would compound the ethical issues. My goal would be to have an open discussion and come to an understanding, so the patient's preferences regarding consent and privacy are respected in the future. This protects her dignity while also upholding ethical standards in medicine.
student-772
student-772
Interview
Interview
Hi Jason, it's good to see you today. I'm glad we could meet up. I was wondering how you've been the last few days since I haven't heard from you - I was concerned. How are the medical school applications going? Is everything okay generally? Have you been eating and sleeping alright? It was surprising when you didn't come to class since you're usually so diligent. I'm sure there's a logical reason, but as your friend I want to make sure you're doing well. Please let me know if there is anything I can do to help or if you need someone to talk to. I'm here for you and just want to make sure you're taking care of yourself. Let me know if you need anything at all.
student-755
student-755
Interview
Interview
Three key qualities that exemplify my personable nature are communication skills, patient advocacy, and ability to collaborate. Peers in school, work, and my personal life would describe me as personable - someone who connects well with others. This involves qualities like effectively communicating, standing up for patients, and finding common ground. I demonstrated these traits early on in my clinical experience volunteering at a family medical clinic. One day an elderly male patient was giving the receptionists a hard time and the other introverted volunteers looked to me to intervene. Despite having no experience, I approached the man and acknowledged his frustration. I engaged him in conversation, asked about his grandchildren, and found commonalities to establish a connection. Though initially angry, he soon relaxed and we had a meaningful interaction. This exemplified using communication, advocacy, and collaboration to resolve a tense situation. The ability to build rapport is so valuable for a healthcare provider. As a prospective physician assistant, I want to bring my personable nature to relate to patients, make them feel heard, and build trust. My interpersonal skills allow me to connect with diverse people, understand their needs, and forge lasting relationships. These qualities represent my strengths.
student-788
student-788
Interview
Interview
Yeah. So of course, since the medical admissions process is so long and tough, I have thought about other career plans. For example, I wanted also to be an engineer because actually a lot of people tell me that those are very different career paths but I actually don't think so. I think that they have a lot of similarities. For example, both in medicine and in engineering, you have to be able to communicate your thoughts clearly and patiently. The engineer has to communicate with his colleagues and with the client and make sure that he can explain everything in simple terms so that everybody understands and is comfortable with what the prognosis will be. The doctor too, has to talk in a simple manner with the patient and he has to make sure that he's very well understood because the patient's treatment is at risk. Also, I think in both careers you need to have an analytic brain, which is something I have because I can analyze things very quickly. For example, when I was in a biology class, the teacher said something and it automatically clicked in my brain that it contradicted something she had said earlier. So I wanted to ask her the question and she told me that it was a mistake. As I said, I'm very able to find when something is not making sense because I have an analytical brain and critical thinking. I think both engineers and doctors have to diagnose and establish a prognosis. Well, they both require critical thinking because sometimes you have to be able to not be so gullible and to actually think for yourself instead of listening to others. Also, I think the main difference between the two is that engineers will require less empathy than doctors, which is why I want to go into medicine and not anymore into engineering because I'm someone who's very empathetic and who can really feel what somebody's feeling and put myself in their shoes. For example, when my friend was really sad one day, I was there for her and I could actually feel her pain and I started crying with her. And also through helping my father, who's sick with multiple sclerosis, I actually could develop and just put forward my empathy, because I always had to know when something was uncomfortable for him, and I helped him through it. And I could also talk with him and figure out what went wrong, why he's sad. And I could always encourage him, and he always felt better afterwards. So this is why I want to go into medicine and not into engineering because I have empathy and I want to use it because I love reassuring people and simply putting a smile on people's faces after they've been sad.
student-796
student-796
Interview
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