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Canadian Medical Association Journal - Ethics Section
Bioethics

The Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) - Ethics Section is a valuable resource that offers an in-depth exploration of ethical and topical issues in Canadian medicine. By delving into various ethical challenges, dilemmas, and perspectives, this section can help premed students prepare as future physicians by broadening their understanding of ethical considerations and fostering a strong foundation in medical ethics.

As premed students prepare for their medical careers, it is essential for them to be well-versed in the ethical principles that govern the practice of medicine. The CMAJ - Ethics Section can provide insights into current debates, emerging trends, and complex issues that physicians may encounter in their professional lives. These ethical discussions can range from informed consent, patient autonomy, and end-of-life care to research ethics, resource allocation, and medical professionalism.

By studying the Ethics Section of the CMAJ, premed students can develop a greater awareness of the ethical dimensions of medical practice and learn to navigate difficult decisions with compassion and integrity. Moreover, engaging with these topics can help students build critical thinking skills, enhance their empathy, and foster a commitment to ethical decision-making in their future careers.

In summary, the Canadian Medical Association Journal - Ethics Section is a valuable resource for premed students, as it offers a comprehensive examination of the ethical issues facing Canadian medicine. By engaging with these topics, students can develop a strong ethical foundation, preparing them to become compassionate and responsible physicians.

Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ)
Health care issues

The Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) is a leading peer-reviewed general medical journal that provides a platform for medical professionals, researchers, and policy-makers to share the latest research, innovations, and insights in the field of medicine. By staying up to date with national medical news, premed students can use the CMAJ to enhance their knowledge and understanding of current medical trends, practices, and advancements.

For premed students, the CMAJ can be a valuable resource in their journey to becoming future physicians. The journal covers a wide range of topics, from clinical research and medical education to health policy and ethical issues, offering a comprehensive view of the ever-evolving medical landscape in Canada and beyond. By regularly reading the CMAJ, students can stay informed about the latest developments in their future profession, enabling them to engage in informed discussions and make well-rounded decisions as future healthcare professionals.

Furthermore, the CMAJ can help premed students develop critical thinking skills by exposing them to various perspectives on complex medical issues, fostering a deeper understanding of the multifaceted nature of medicine. This will also help them stay aware of the challenges and opportunities faced by healthcare professionals, promoting a proactive and forward-thinking approach to their medical education.

In summary, the Canadian Medical Association Journal can significantly contribute to premed students' preparedness as future physicians. By staying current with the latest medical news, research, and discussions, they can broaden their knowledge, enhance their critical thinking skills, and develop a comprehensive understanding of the medical field, better equipping them for their future careers in medicine.

CPSO reporting guidelines
Bioethics

The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario (CPSO) reporting guidelines outline mandatory and permissive reporting policies for physicians practicing in Ontario. These guidelines are essential for maintaining professional conduct and protecting the public interest. Premed students can benefit from understanding these guidelines as they prepare for their future careers as physicians.

Mandatory reports are legally required and often involve specific information or professional medical opinions. Permissive reports, on the other hand, are based on professional responsibility and ethics, allowing physicians to use their discretion in deciding whether to make a report.

Some mandatory reporting obligations include child abuse or neglect, impaired driving ability, sexual abuse of a patient, and communicable diseases. Permissive reports might involve instances where disclosing patient information is necessary to protect others from harm.

Premed students should familiarize themselves with these reporting guidelines to better understand the legal, professional, and ethical reporting obligations they will face as physicians. By doing so, they can prepare for situations that may require them to balance patient confidentiality with public interest and safety.

In addition, premed students can develop effective communication skills by learning how to inform patients about their reporting duties when appropriate. This transparency can help build trust and strengthen the physician-patient relationship.

Understanding CPSO reporting guidelines will enable premed students to navigate complex reporting obligations and make informed decisions in their future practice. It is crucial for students to consult resources such as the Canadian Medical Protective Association (CMPA), the Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario (IPC), and the College's Physician Advisory Service (PAS) for further guidance on reporting obligations.

Indigenous Health Calls to Action
Health care issues

Recent developments in the search for the children of residential schools have shown that there is much work to be done in terms of truth and reconciliation. Medical schools are similarly placing a higher emphasis on justice for indigenous communities. It's crucial that all applicants understand the Calls to Action, the disparities that indigenous communities face, and how to improve the healthcare system for indigenous peoples.

The Indigenous Health Calls to Action is a response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's recommendations for redressing the historical injustices faced by Indigenous communities in Canada. This initiative aims to improve the healthcare system for Indigenous peoples and address the disparities they face. As future physicians, pre-med students must understand the Calls to Action to better serve Indigenous communities.

The Calls to Action cover various aspects, including child welfare, education, language and culture, health, and justice. It seeks to address the historical context of residential schools and their legacy on Indigenous peoples. Some health-related recommendations include acknowledging the current state of Indigenous health, establishing measurable goals for closing gaps in health outcomes, and providing sustainable funding for healing centers.

For pre-med students, understanding the Calls to Action can help them prepare for a more inclusive and culturally-sensitive healthcare practice. Medical and nursing schools are encouraged to require courses that deal with Indigenous health issues, history, and the legacy of residential schools. Such training should include intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.

By being aware of these Calls to Action, pre-med students can contribute to a more equitable healthcare system, addressing the unique needs of Indigenous communities. This knowledge will allow future physicians to provide better care to Indigenous patients, understand the historical context of their health disparities, and work collaboratively with Indigenous healers and Elders when appropriate. Overall, understanding the Indigenous Health Calls to Action is crucial for pre-med students to become well-rounded and compassionate physicians capable of serving diverse populations.

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